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mountainman
01-21-2011, 12:17 PM
I thought it might be fun and illuminating to disclose our occupations and non-racing interests. Who are you and what do you do when you aren't wagering or posting? Apologies to members who might find this thread too probing or personal. If so, just ignore it.

DJofSD
01-21-2011, 12:32 PM
IT professional. Divorced with an 11 year old son. Never enough time to follow lots of interests outside of 'capping. Right now, the one that my son and I are sharing is learning to golf.

The_Knight_Sky
01-21-2011, 12:49 PM
v2sWjouB1YA Hey you're playing my song.


I'm a jack-of-all-trades for an electronics corporation.
When I'm not working, I am "working" on pet trainer patterns.

I relax by updating my racing blog
and getting hell from everyone who reads it. :D

I gave up the statistics of MLB and now avidly follow the NFL scene.
I also dabble in photography/videography/discography,
staying in shape and trying to eat right.
That should be enough to get Gimmick Girl interested. http://i51.tinypic.com/2llgjza.gif

onefast99
01-21-2011, 12:50 PM
Semi-retired consultant in the mortgage industry(25 years), I do work-outs for borrowers who have had their commercial notes(some residential) purchased by a third party normally thru an auction by the FDIC from a failed bank. I am an AAU baseball coach from March to the first week of November I coach my sons team.

lamboguy
01-21-2011, 12:58 PM
first of all, i live breath and sleep horses. i am paying off 2 x-wives, i run 5 miles a day indoors or outdoors depending on the weather, workout, trade stocks, manage a couple of pieces of property, and i help people to lose weight and try to help them take care of themselves without having to take pills, i also spend about 17 hours a day reading pace advantage and arguing with a few people when i have time.

Wickel
01-21-2011, 01:04 PM
Managing editor of New Mexico Magazine going on 22 years. Been a print journalist all my adult life, working at several newspapers around and state. Even tried putting together a horse-racing publication called "Southwest Inside Horse Racing." When I'm not handicapping, I'm betting on other sports. I'm a huge fan of the Chicago White Sox, Indianapolis Colts and Los Angeles Lakers, but all pale in comparison to the ponies.

illinoisbred
01-21-2011, 01:24 PM
Never married,single 54 yr. old, raising a 7 yr. old girl who was literally left on my doorstep by a wayward niece at the age of 1. Main occupation is installing playgrounds and constructing shelter buildings at parks, schools,etc..Work a 2nd job for a large suburban newspaper-circulation dept.-delivery guy. Enjoy reading-mostly history,longhair music-everything from Bach to Phillip Glass. Been handicapping and wagering since 1982 and never tire of it!

DJofSD
01-21-2011, 01:29 PM
Long hair music :ThmbUp:

Phillip Glass :ThmbUp: :ThmbUp:

Bach :ThmbUp: :ThmbUp: :ThmbUp:

fiveouttasix
01-21-2011, 01:36 PM
Owned my own Printshop (with my wife) for 20 years, lost the whole shop to hurricane Floyd in 99. Started up again at a new location in 2000, lost that one to the Economy...now sell printing for a larger firm. Never tire from handicapping...as my wife says I have a one track mind!

Fat Syd
01-21-2011, 02:07 PM
Very large African American ex con. Did 4 years in the NY penial system for stabbing a guy. It was self defense! I have been playing the game since I am 13 years old. Learned to handicap from pappy. Love the game.

Steve 'StatMan'
01-21-2011, 02:14 PM
I'm a single (divorced, she passed away later) former computer programmer (COBOL) who burned out, and turned to handicapping - got recommended for a rare spot at IL Sports News/The Green Sheet in Chicago (a.k.a the Finger Sheet in KY. & Florida) I do a graded handicap for a number of tracks, including MNR when we use them (love your show w/Nancy) and cover the NYRA tracks, GP & CRC, FG, CD for a sister publication (Clocker Riley), sometimes AP and many, many more. Selections under varying nom-de-plumes.

Had things go bad in other areas, so have cut back seriously on my wagering the last 3 years, but things are getting better now, and I plan to start getting back to following the races again when Hawthorne starts again.

I offer a side product to my friend Scott McMannis's customers that help him and his customers use his own product must faster and more efficiently.

All that stuff has me pretty busy, and working from home. I don't do much outside of work, but at least at my new apt building I can now use the wireless access in the common-access computer room so I can finally work around people again. I loved being around people in my computer days, and making jokes, and just being around people. Pace Advantage Forum helps in giving me back at least an online social life that I missed so much.

I fell in love with Candlepin Bowling visiting the Northeast, I was a longtime 10-pin bowler. But there is no Candlepin bowling outside of the northeast. I'm working on a decent outdoor home version right now, so I can get some sort of practice (free!) and get good enough so I can hopefully compete - I watch the tournament bowlers on old youtube videos and want to swim with and/or against the dolphins' once in a while hopefully. Maybe I'll retire out east eventually.

Greyfox
01-21-2011, 02:18 PM
I fell in love with Candlepin Bowling visiting the Northeast, I was a longtime 10-pin bowler. But there is no Candlepin bowling outside of the northeast. .

Sounds like a great business idea for someone outside of the NE.

Overlay
01-21-2011, 02:27 PM
I've worked as a Civil Service employee (ammunition inspector)(glorified title: Quality Assurance Specialist (Ammunition Surveillance)) for the Army since 1978, stationed at seven different duty locations in the U.S. and Germany, seeing to it through inspection and testing that the ammunition our warfighters need is properly classified as to condition/serviceability; is safe to handle, ship, and store; and will function as intended when the time comes to use it (plus all the paperwork/logistic/administrative stuff that goes along with that). My interest in handicapping has been one constant thread through all that time (dating back to my college days and (I hope) extending into retirement (in about three years)). I met my wife in conjunction with a job-related temporary-duty trip to the Philippines, and we'll be celebrating (along with our son (in law school) and our daughter (in college)) our silver anniversary this October.

turfnsport
01-21-2011, 02:31 PM
I fell in love with Candlepin Bowling visiting the Northeast, I was a longtime 10-pin bowler. But there is no Candlepin bowling outside of the northeast. I'm working on a decent outdoor home version right now, so I can get some sort of practice (free!) and get good enough so I can hopefully compete - I watch the tournament bowlers on old youtube videos and want to swim with and/or against the dolphins' once in a while hopefully. Maybe I'll retire out east eventually.

Post some pictures when you get your alley going...When I lived in MD I bowled on the Duckpin Pro Tour. I have a dream of making an outside Duckpin alley in my backyard here in Florida.

lsbets
01-21-2011, 02:31 PM
I own a restaurant with my wife. Get in early in the morning and handicap the days races then cook through lunch and dinner. I have 3 kids - 8 year old boy, 6 year old girl, and a 2 year old girl with another one on the way. Married for 10 years. My family is everything to me. My son just finished his first season of football, and decided he wanted to play tennis, so now I get to have fun watching the tennis channel with him. My 6 year old is an amazingly talented gymnast, so three days a week my wife or I take her 30 minutes away to go to the best gymnastics gym in the world. The two year old has grown up in the restaurant, so she can swear in English and Spanish!

GaryG
01-21-2011, 02:36 PM
I have been a full time player since the early 70s (after 5 years of heavy drug use). It was either the drugs or the horses that cost me two marriages, possibly a combination. Before 2000 I played at the track only. I lived in Arcadia for 15 years and drove to Hollywood and Del Mar. I have cut back in recent years to spend more time with my wife. I also provide some plays for a friend of mine who sells a selection sheet. If my parents knew what profession I would choose they would not have paid for me to get a degree from USC. If Arizona had the horsey program when I was younger I may have gone into track administration. What a long strange trip it has been.

mostpost
01-21-2011, 02:36 PM
Education: Bachelor of Liberal Arts from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. Major on Political Science; Minor in History.

Military: Drafted for two years. Basic at Fort Polk. (Not a good time. I was in terrible shape, Louisiana in the summer is hot and humid. Drill Sargeants don't let you rest when you're tired. :mad: After Basic I spent a few months at Fort Hood, Tx. then on to Korea. The same day I flew out of Korea to be discharged. North Korea attacked the Pueblo and everyone there was extended several months.

Career: During High School and College I worked in my family's mom and pop grocery store. After college I worked for a pipe manufacturer, (Pipe as in what water flows through, not what you smoke.) an electronics manufacturing company, an insurance company, a millwork house and another millwork house before joining the United States Postal Service. All of the companies I worked for before USPS either went out of business or underwent a drastic restructuring within three years of my employment. It wasn't my fault. Really, it wasn't.

Personal: I enjoy the challenge of handicapping. I just wish I was better at it.
I sing in the choir at my church. (I'm the twelfth best singer in the group.
I used to be tenth best, but we got two new members recently. Hate it when that happpens!)
I am also active in the local community theater. I performed on stage, built scenery, painted, sold program ads, sold tickets, broke down sets, everything needed to put on a show. Everything but fixing up the old barn outside of town. I even authored (with others) a murder mystery.
Music: No Hip Hop; no Rap; otherwise it's all good.
I used to be an avid bicyclist. Took two trips across Wisconsin from LaCrosse to Kenosha. Age and a unwanted visitor (Arthur Itis) have curtailed that.

Sports as a spectator: Fan of the Bulls, Bears, Cubs, and to a lesser degree Blackhawks. White Sox? :ThmbDown: :ThmbDown: :ThmbDown:

I am also a fan of the local high school basketball team (My alma mater). I go to most of the games. (100% the last few years; 80%+ most years) Have done so since 1959 minus time away at college and in military.

Anyway, that's my story. Hope I haven't bored you; except a few of you I hope I've bored a lot. nudge, nudge. ;) ;)

nijinski
01-21-2011, 02:50 PM
I was the only one of my COF to be married and become a Mom at eighteen.
I've grown up since . Divorced with two lovely daughters.
Grandkids won't call me grandma , so Nema it is.
Worked in the medical field over twenty years , Assisting and Adm However
my first two jods were on the Backstretch followed by Equine Insurance.

Besides all things horses , I play acoustic guitar , do volunteer work
for troubled teens with substance abuse. Watch too many forensic crime shows.

Zman179
01-21-2011, 03:24 PM
I'm a motorman (driver) for the New York City subway. My lines change every week (that's the way I like it), and I'll be on the A train next week. Who knows, you might lose your shirt at Aqueduct and I might be the one taking you home. :D

On the side I'm an avid traveller who'll drop everything at the sight of an airline ticket and I'm fascinated by the French language; I speak it fluently and listen/watch tv programs daily to try to stay on my toes. I'm hoping to fly to Germany and Switzerland next month for vacation (French won't work, but maybe a side trip to Strasbourg? Hmmm...)

DJofSD
01-21-2011, 03:42 PM
Zman -- I'm envious.

I'll watch the local broadcast of the news from France that is on 3 times a week hoping to expand my vocabulary. A little latin and spanish helps but I need to acquire more of an ear for the spoken language. Oh well, just another interest that I don't have enought time to do correctly.

Bruddah
01-21-2011, 03:47 PM
I grew up in Galveston Tx and No. Little Rock Ar. went into the Marine Corp in 1966 and got out in 1972. Went back to school at the Univ. of Texas and graduated in 1975. Was hired as a Mgr. trainee for a large trucking company. First assignment was in Abilene Tx., later transferred all over Texas and the United States. Developed a reputation as a Manager able to make "turn arounds" happen, which later led me to a career of corporate "turn arounds", which later led me to Board of Director assignments.

I have been playing the horses since 1965, except for a few years while overseas. Continuously playing the horses since about 1971, I love the analysis leading up to the race and the discovery after the race as to why you're wrong most of the time. A tough game to beat but a "connected guy" in Kansas City showed me how. I have been using his method since about 1992 and it has been profitable all but one year. I admit, for health reasons and Dr.'s orders, I have not played as much as I would like. But, it's my life long Hobby and I love it. :ThmbUp:

Cardus
01-21-2011, 04:38 PM
I am the guy who arrested Fat Syd.

Jay Trotter
01-21-2011, 05:15 PM
Anyway, that's my story. Hope I haven't bored you; except a few of you I hope I've bored a lot. nudge, nudge. ;) ;)

Mostie, you forgot to mention all those radical left wing activities a certain somebody would have us believe you are involved in....

nijinski
01-21-2011, 06:17 PM
I was the only one of my COF to be married and become a Mom at eighteen.
I've grown up since . Divorced with two lovely daughters.
Grandkids won't call me grandma , so Nema it is.
Worked in the medical field over twenty years , Assisting and Adm However
my first two jods were on the Backstretch followed by Equine Insurance.

Besides all things horses , I play acoustic guitar , do volunteer work
for troubled teens with substance abuse. Watch too many forensic crime shows.
Forgot to mention a favorite past time of mine. When called upon by BH horse rescue who's location is in Fla. I am too far to help hands on so I enjoy
doing research and calling on breeders and owners for them regarding the
abandoned horses .

boxcar
01-21-2011, 06:22 PM
first of all, i live breath and sleep horses. i am paying off 2 x-wives, i run 5 miles a day indoors or outdoors depending on the weather, workout, trade stocks, manage a couple of pieces of property, and i help people to lose weight and try to help them take care of themselves without having to take pills, i also spend about 17 hours a day reading pace advantage and arguing with a few people when i have time.

AND...according to some -- "gaming" the Mass health care system. ;)

Boxcar

mostpost
01-21-2011, 06:27 PM
Mostie, you forgot to mention all those radical left wing activities a certain somebody would have us believe you are involved in....
That's funny because I have attended only one political function in my life. When I was in college in 1964 they held a mock political convention. They chose Republican because there was a much more interesting race than the Democrats. I was a delegate for George Romney. If memory serves he won.

wisconsin
01-21-2011, 06:51 PM
Sales Manager at a local Ford store. Been playing since I was old enough to bet. My dad owned whole and parts of harness horses, so we were at the track a lot. Tried selling tip sheets outside of Hawthorne in 1982, was "kindly" advised to stop on 3rd day. First horse ever given (Trojan Swoon) paid $23.

Once owned a gas station, lost my lease, then was a grocery store manager, but now selling cars since 2002. Only the 3rd real job I've ever had.

Had a 1-900 line in the mid-'90's, gave away a $60 horse at Belmont (Tarquin Joe) on a day we had only 2 callers. That was a loser business, to be sure. Made some money with my tips for a year at TipShop.com, but too much effort for little return. Now I collect tracks, about 2 per year.

Play from home a few of days a week, very good at Los Al pick 4's.....

Married 26 years, four sons ages 17, 21, 23, 25. It's a wonderful life!

Fred
01-21-2011, 06:53 PM
Worked 37 years in the QSR (fast food) industry all with Long John Silvers as VP of operations with three different Franchisees. Born and raised in Martins Ferry, Oh (home of Lou Groza). Spent 9 years in Champaign, Il and the last 13 years in Knoxville, TN.
I retired July 31st of last year. My Daughter is a junior at the University of Illinois. Wife and I are still living in Knoxville. Ohio State and Steeler fan. And of course I love racing.

Freddy

boxcar
01-21-2011, 07:27 PM
Now I collect tracks, about 2 per year.

You lost me. Could you, please, elaborate on what you mean by this?

It's a wonderful life!

It is indeed. :ThmbUp:

Boxcar

lamboguy
01-21-2011, 07:37 PM
AND...according to some -- "gaming" the Mass health care system. ;)

Boxcar
thanks for reminding me after 46 post's on the subject

boxcar
01-21-2011, 07:40 PM
thanks for reminding me after 46 post's on the subject

That's all there were? :D :D

Boxcar

Dave Schwartz
01-21-2011, 08:14 PM
Away from horse racing? Why would anyone have a life away from horse racing?

Seriously, horse racing and computers have been most of my life since I couldn't play black jack any more (1977). From then to now I have done a lot -

I spent years in the gaming industry as a dealer (craps and BJ, mostly, but could find my way around roulette as well), floorman and boxman.

I was a martial artist for 15 years - quit for 6 months and gained 40 pounds. Lost the edge forever.

Coached baseball at many levels, from 9-10 year olds, to men's amateur baseball, to high school and junior college.

Went to professional baseball umpires school.

Before horse racing there was playing pool for a living (not a good living, but a living), jumping out of airplanes and being a general tough guy in the jungle, a stint in the life insurance business. Oh, and I worked some of my way through high school dealing poker and blackjack in an illegal casino in Miami's Liberty City.

Worked three summers (ages 13-15) as a waiter at the Concord hotel in Kiamesha Lake, NY.


Boy, do I love this thread. What a great idea.

Robert Goren
01-21-2011, 08:41 PM
I am 62 and never married, but strung a girl along for 20 years if that counts. I was raised by grandparents on a farm. I went UNL for 4 years and majored almost everything and never got a degree. I mostly worked in the liquor business until 1987. Then I went to parking lot management until my health gave out in 2007. I am now retired and on SS disability. My dad was gambler, so I come by it naturally. I played some part time Blackjack for awhile and a little money. I play some online poker and made some pretty money for about 3 years. I break even now. I played a little tournment bridge in the early 70s, but gave it up because I hate traveling.

cj's dad
01-21-2011, 10:05 PM
BUT;

Married right out of high school to the most wonderful girl I have ever met in my life. She gave birth to my three sons. All are doing well.

She died from cancer at age 48 and I miss her every single day of my life. . I have managed to become an electrical inspector with a masters license (Master Electrician) in Balt. City/ County and the State of Maryland.

Donnie
01-21-2011, 10:12 PM
Have been a certified computer instructor for the past 14 years. I teach 30 different application level classes. Love it! Much more than the previous 23 years I spent in the Restaurant Industry, mostly as a multi-unit supervisor. If you are doing the math, I'm a young 51.

Currently enjoying my second Rodeo...been 10 years with this same filly...16 yrs with the previous old mare. Love it! The older mare threw 2 colts, one will be graduating this Spring from the University of Iowa (pre-Chiropractic plus a major in Spanish)....you've seen Jake on TV if you have taken in any Ia Hawk games in the past 4 yrs. He's been on the Spirit Squad and ALWAYS finds his way on National TV or in the papers. Second colt is MUCH more bullheaded at 16. He's a tough break.

Bet my first race at 16 at Arlington Park. Skipped school, took a bus to Chicago from Dubuque, IA (3 hours). Really like playing in Tournaments, although I don't have the time I would like to invest in it. Took a major turn for the better when I started to analyze the races in Microsoft Access. For 2 years I have devoted a lot of my time to the gym. Sometimes I think I am in better shape than I was when I was 18. Living the Dream!! Seriously!!!

Friend me on Facebook if you are crazy enough. Search for Don Nadermann.

BOL!! (Best of Luck!!)

Teach
01-21-2011, 10:17 PM
Well, first and foremost, I’ve been a high history school teacher (1965-2001).

Yet, over the years, I’ve held various part-time jobs. My first job was as a drug store clerk at a Boston pharmacy. I started off at .90 cents an hour in the summer of 1958 (I was about to turn 16-years-old). I would later work at a drug store across the street from my apartment building.

During my college years, I served as a porter at a Boston department store called Gilchrist’s ($1.20 an hour). I remember during that year' s Major League Baseball All-Star game that I spent about two hours dusting off all of the store’s televisions (all of which were tuned to the game).

Later, I would serve as a driver-clerk for a wallpaper business on Centre St. in the Jamaica Plain section of Boston.

In addition, I would work at a restaurant called Sharaf’s in Brookline. I waited tables (“Burn the British!). I'd later work in their commissary.

A while later, I worked at Brigham’s (soda & sandwich shop). First, on Charles Street in the Beacon Hill section and and then in downtown Boston on Summer Street.

Other part-time jobs I had were: working as a library page at a Boston University library; waiting tables at a small dinner called "The Buttery"; it was located in Kenmore Square. I left "The Buttery" job after two days. They were socialists! All the tips were pooled and divvied up to everyone who worked that shift. No thanks!

During college, I'd go door-to-door in the Greater Boston area delivering samples of laundry detergent for an advertising firm. Summers, I'd caddy at a private golf course (I knew the caddy master). I also did some tutoring.

When I was college student, I worked at both Jordan Marsh and Filene's in downtown Boston. One of my department store jobs involved bouncing a balloon with an elastic (as seen on Miss Jean's "Romper Room") braced around the palm of my hand It reminded me of a paddle-ball game, only in this case, it was a large balloon.

After I got married, I worked as a cab driver for a cab company in Brookline, MA. Later, I would work as as a sports goods clerk for a now defunct retail outlet called Mammoth Mart. I would also work as a limo driver.

Other part-time jobs included: sports stringer for local newspapers; disc jockey at local radio station (I would later do news, sports, and sports talk).

Later, I would write Red Sox and Celtics trivia rhymes that aired on Boston radio stations. I would also be the head of my own sports production company (No, I didn’t make the Fortune 500) producing Cable TV sports programming. It was a hands-on kind of thing where I would solicit advertising, shoot commercials, voice copy, and do play-by-play. I had as many as ten people, mostly high school and college students, working for me.

In the early 1980s, I would serve as WEEI's (CBS in Boston) Boston Manager of Network Sports Operations (I took a leave-of-absence from teaching). My main job was set up and manage WEEI's 35-station New England Patriots Radio Network.

In the mid-1980s, I would become a publicity director, harness racing announcer, and tip-sheet handicapper at the now defunct Foxboro Raceway (Why is it that most places I've worked at have gone out of business). I would also serve as a state judge (nothing special, I walked around the track with the lead-outs) at Raynham-Taunton Greyhound Park (MA recently voted out dog racing).

I've been a member of both The New England Harness Writers and New England Turf Writers.

As the years went by, I would "voice" ads for the Talking Phone Book. I would also write weekly articles for a Las Vegas-based e-zine called eVegas.com (now defunct). I would become the Saturday-night host of WEEI's Nightly Racing Roundup.

In 2003, I would win a New England-wide contest sponsored by Samuel Adams Beer. I called a portion of an inter-league game between the Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals. In 2004, I'd call portions of four games between the Peoria Chiefs and Ft. Wayne Wizards.

Finally, I was a Boston Red Sox Fenway Park Tour Guide.

Oh, when my son started his own home improvements business, I worked with him on roofing jobs, siding, decks and room additions. However, first and foremost, I’ve been a husband, father and grandfather.

Ocala Mike
01-21-2011, 11:04 PM
I'm 69 years old and still don't know the answer to that question.


Ocala Mike

wisconsin
01-21-2011, 11:09 PM
You lost me. Could you, please, elaborate on what you mean by this?

Boxcar

Visit different racetracks.

magwell
01-21-2011, 11:27 PM
I'm consumed by the greatest and toughest game played outdoors and wouldn't want it any other way......:cool:

Tom
01-22-2011, 12:26 AM
Worked 33 years as a Quality Manager ( worked up from off shift inspector in 1973), until my company got bought out and the new one closed all the union plants and moved everything to Mexico and Canada. Happy as hell that the whole damn place is now out of business. Used to travel a lot - 5-6 times a month, now none at all and I don't miss it.

Have basically the same job now, but in a much smaller plant - about 40 people, compared to 21 plants nationwide! Much smaller salary, too! :mad:
But it's work.

Been playing horses since about 1964 or so, Finger Lakes. Got hooked when I won my first bet ever. My Dad used to take me and a couple of friends out on weekends.

My Brother-in-law is a ferrier and used to drive harness.

plainolebill
01-22-2011, 01:49 AM
I'm 68 and was in the service from 1960-1989 (8 years USN, 20 years USCG). I spent half my time in the Coast Guard on polar icebreakers going to both the antarctic and arctic many time. I took a break between services working as a stevadore loading munitions on ammo ships.

After retiring from the service I worked as an electrician , first as a journeyman and later had the Oregon equivilant to a master's card. I've got a son (Navy Veteran) and a daughter. My son lives locally and I see him and his children regularly. My daughter is married to a Lt. Colonel in the USAF - so we don't see them as often.

I got interested in racing because of my aunt, who lived with us, was a fanatic. Every day after I got home from school we'd sit in the kitchen looking through the charts and entries in the LA Times which had an extensive racing section in the 1950's. She'd buy a form about once a week and take the bus either to Hollywood Park or Santa Anita - she'd bet horses that we'd picked out. I don't remember how we did, I hope better than I'm doing now.

Besides horse racing I like to build furniture and cabinets, do remodeling projects, grow a vegetable garden, I spend a lot of time reading, and my wife and I do a little traveling. We'll be going to Kuaui next Friday for 2 weeks.... get a little relief from the gloom.

NJ Stinks
01-22-2011, 02:08 AM
And CJ's Dad says he may regret posting here.

Ever since Mostpost got here I've been feeling more than uneasy. Namely because Mostpost catches hell for being a retired government employee. So am I.

I worked for the IRS for 33 years starting in the early 1970's. The first 7 years I was as an income tax agent and the rest of my career I was an excise tax specialist. My best work involved uncovering fuel tax evasion. No use boring anyone with the details but my audits and subsequent court testimony brought down more than a few almost notorious tax cheats in the NY/NJ metropollitan area.

While at the IRS I learned a lot that makes me the political animal I am today. For instance, an unwritten policy during the Reagan years was to avoid auditing anybody making over $125,000 a year. (Not corporations. Individuals.) This 'mandate' flew in the face of tried and true IRS policy. Namely, make an adjustment to a big taxpayer's return and chances are the tax deficiency will be huge. Make an adjustment on a small earner and the tax deficiency will be minimal at best. (Remember, our unstated goal was to assess and collect additional tax revenue for the country. Our stated goal was more politically correct - to enforce voluntary tax compliance.) Another example of Republican policy was in the late 1980's when our Criminal Investigation Division focused their resources on tax cheats in Atlantic City. After all, who deserved a lesson more than those cocktail waitresses and the other pinnacles of tax evasion in AC - the teenage kids keeping those unreported dollar bills when they parked your car in the valet lots? Yep, that was a supposed big deal and even made the local newspapers. I'm sure white collar criminals everywhere rejoiced!

What am I saying? We don't have white collar crime in NJ. :lol:

At any rate, on the personal side my wife and I have been married for 31 years but were never lucky enough to have children. Since she is from London I have made the trip over there at least 40 times since we met. It was only in last ten years that we could afford to expand our trips over there to places like Belgium, France, Spain and Portugal. Unfortunately, my wife had colon cancer a few years ago - she had the tumor removed and underwent chemo. Her oncologist said at the time that if the cancer didn't return within 5 years chances are it would never return. Sadly, we found out the colon cancer metastasized to her lungs last summer. Surgery is no longer an option and she is currently going through six months of chemotherapy. The goal is to be cancer-free for a few years and then repeat the chemo treatments when the cancer resurfaces. Not a great prognosis for sure but she is a brave woman with a strong will to beat it. (I can't imagine the pain CJ's Dad and family went through and I pray that I won't have to anytime soon.)

Other than my wife the biggest passion in my life is playing the horses. I'm one of those guys who loses about 15% to 20% of his wagers year in and year out but I keep telling myself the entertainment value is off the charts! :D My only other real hobby nowadays (besides travelling) is playing golf. I started playing about 8 years ago after I stopped playing softball. I love the game despite the fact that I've never broken 100.

In closing, I want to tell Mostpost I'm sorry I let him catch a load of crap for being a civil servant while I sat back and watched. The thing is - usually there absolutely no upside to telling someone I worked for the IRS. Either somebody had a bad experience with the IRS or somebody needs help dealing with the IRS. Honestly, I had no idea it may be worse to be a postman until I came here! :lol:

mostpost
01-22-2011, 02:30 AM
And CJ's Dad says he may regret posting here.

Ever since Mostpost got here I've been feeling more than uneasy. Namely because Mostpost catches hell for being a retired government employee. So am I.

I worked for the IRS for 33 years starting in the early 1970's. The first 7 years I was as an income tax agent and the rest of my career I was an excise tax specialist. My best work involved uncovering fuel tax evasion. No use boring anyone with the details but my audits and subsequent court testimony brought down more than a few almost notorious tax cheats in the NY/NJ metropollitan area.

While at the IRS I learned a lot that makes me the political animal I am today. For instance, an unwritten policy during the Reagan years was to avoid auditing anybody making over $125,000 a year. (Not corporations. Individuals.) This 'mandate' flew in the face of tried and true IRS policy. Namely, make an adjustment to a big taxpayer's return and chances are the tax deficiency will be huge. Make an adjustment on a small earner and the tax deficiency will be minimal at best. (Remember, our unstated goal was to assess and collect additional tax revenue for the country. Our stated goal was more politically correct - to enforce voluntary tax compliance.) Another example of Republican policy was in the late 1980's when our Criminal Investigation Division focused their resources on tax cheats in Atlantic City. After all, who deserved a lesson more than those cocktail waitresses and the other pinnacles of tax evasion in AC - the teenage kids keeping those unreported dollar bills when they parked your car in the valet lots? Yep, that was a supposed big deal and even made the local newspapers. I'm sure white collar criminals everywhere rejoiced!

What am I saying? We don't have white collar crime in NJ. :lol:

At any rate, on the personal side my wife and I have been married for 31 years but were never lucky enough to have children. Since she is from London I have made the trip over there at least 40 times since we met. It was only in last ten years that we could afford to expand our trips over there to places like Belgium, France, Spain and Portugal. Unfortunately, my wife had colon cancer a few years ago - she had the tumor removed and underwent chemo. Her oncologist said at the time that if the cancer didn't return within 5 years chances are it would never return. Sadly, we found out the colon cancer metastasized to her lungs last summer. Surgery is no longer an option and she is currently going through six months of chemotherapy. The goal is to be cancer-free for a few years and then repeat the chemo treatments when the cancer resurfaces. Not a great prognosis for sure but she is a brave woman with a strong will to beat it. (I can't imagine the pain CJ's Dad and family went through and I pray that I won't have to anytime soon.)

Other than my wife the biggest passion in my life is playing the horses. I'm one of those guys who loses about 15% to 20% of his wagers year in and year out but I keep telling myself the entertainment value is off the charts! :D My only other real hobby nowadays (besides travelling) is playing golf. I started playing about 8 years ago after I stopped playing softball. I love the game despite the fact that I've never broken 100.

In closing, I want to tell Mostpost I'm sorry I let him catch a load of crap for being a civil servant while I sat back and watched. The thing is - usually there absolutely no upside to telling someone I worked for the IRS. Either somebody had a bad experience with the IRS or somebody needs help dealing with the IRS. Honestly, I had no idea it may be worse to be a postman until I came here! :lol:
THE IRS??? Now even I don't like you. :bang: :bang:
No, seriously, I'm glad to have your help in educating the cons, although it is a thankless job. Of course you know which segment of this board will not believe that Reagan had a policy of looking the other way concerning earners of plus $125,000

Jay Trotter
01-22-2011, 11:21 AM
I worked for the IRS for 33 years starting in the early 1970's.

Whoa, this is bad! Real bad! I would akin this to being a cop and then going to the slammer. You're gonna have to keep your back to the wall for a good while now NJ.

In particular, I would keep an eye out on Boxie --- word in the yard is that he has a shiv!!!

Tom
01-22-2011, 11:31 AM
Originally Posted by NJ Stinks

I worked for the IRS for 33 years starting in the early 1970's.



Well, lost another two hundred Friday......same thing every day. :rolleyes:

BlueShoe
01-22-2011, 12:08 PM
One of my long time race track friends, now getting close to retirement, works for the IR-SS. According to sources, he works deep down in a soundproof basement, a room equiped with racks, hot irons, whips, and the lastest electro shock instruments. On the wall hangs a large portrait of Heinrich Himmler with a caption written on a plaque beneath it stating "Our Founder and Inspiration". Whenever I mention all this he just smiles slyly. Our taxpayer dollars hard at work.

Beachbabe
01-22-2011, 12:25 PM
Well, lost another two hundred Friday......same thing every day. :rolleyes:


:lol: LMAO.


On a more serious note, CJ's Dad...one of my brothers lost his wife at 50 so I know a little bit about the pain you endured.

NJ...........though I disagree with you politically (not on this forum...I wont get involved in political debates....I'm chicken), I hope & pray for a full recovery for your wife.

BlueShoe
01-22-2011, 12:30 PM
Education: Bachelor of Liberal Arts from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.
Mosty, you're a Saluki? One of the :cool: est team mascot names in the nation, imo. That must mean one of three things;
A. You are a very fast runner, or at least once were.
B. You are an expert greyhound handicapper, but never mention it here.
C. None of the above.

Rookies
01-22-2011, 12:40 PM
WOW ! I'm amazed at the response garnered for this thread. I belong to another forum related to gambling. This type of question has been tried off and on over the years. It dies quickly and any response is usually quick, as in : "GFY- this is a gambling forum. " Of course, Horse Racing is, for the most part, legalized; ergo the difference.

Some very cool and interesting backgrounds (except NJS- of course :lol: ), interesting stories, warm takes and sad facts previous.

I'm waiting for Box to ante up... then... I will. ;)

mostpost
01-22-2011, 12:47 PM
Mosty, you're a Saluki? One of the :cool: est team mascot names in the nation, imo. That must mean one of three things;
A. You are a very fast runner, or at least once were.
B. You are an expert greyhound handicapper, but never mention it here.
C. None of the above.

A. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
B. I haven't lost at the dog track since......let's see.....since the last time I went to the dog track. So "B" is wrong too.
C. Bingo

You are right. A Saluki is a very :cool: mascot and one of the oldest breeds of dog. When I was at SIU I learned there were Salukis in Egypt over 4000 years ago. Must be close to 5000 now. ][

Black Ruby
01-22-2011, 12:52 PM
Ky grad, land surveyor for about 20 years, last 5 of those were in No. VA. Turned to graphics, have a small firm with a friend from junior high, we do a lot of work for the local zoo, exhibit ID's, signs, murals, I've even painted zebra striping on the pavement. That business has been down the last 2 years, so I also work full time at a gym for people 40 and up, teaching them how to use the resisitance machines, oldest members are 91, it's a pretty cool thing.

Never married, and somehow no children as much practicing as I've done. Other than handicapping, I scuba dive and flyfish, do vegetable gardening (new website on urban gardening is about ready) and cook, and drink bourbon, switch to tequila in the summers. Used to play a lot of guitar in local bands.

Went to the races the first time when i was about 6, my parents took me to Keeneland. Had an aunt who ponied horses to the gate at CD, she married a horse van driver, I used to get to ride to the backside with him when I was in first grade. Our family even got a billy goat from the backside. Favorite memory of him was when he got loose and went across the street, put his head up under the housecoat of the large lady neighbor.

Just turned 58 this week, looking forward to some great seafood and a few beverages tonight to celebrate.

NJ Stinks
01-22-2011, 01:04 PM
:lol: LMAO.


On a more serious note, CJ's Dad...one of my brothers lost his wife at 50 so I know a little bit about the pain you endured.

NJ...........though I disagree with you politically (not on this forum...I wont get involved in political debates....I'm chicken), I hope & pray for a full recovery for your wife.

Beachbabe (love your username! :cool: ), thanks for kind words regarding my wife.

As for the political stuff, it's fun to play point/counterpoint -especially here because we have lots of players!

lsbets
01-22-2011, 01:17 PM
Believe it or not NJ, as a business owner I've been pleased with my few interactions with the IRS. I called with some questions, and they were answered courteously and professionally. It's the state agencies that suck ass.

riskman
01-22-2011, 01:55 PM
Born in Albany,NY. Father was Irish Catholic.Moved to NYC as jobs was scarce. Father was printer and union man. Mother was sickly died at early age. Brother is a Psychologist, lives in Tampa,FL. Went to catholic grammar and high school. Boxed in Golden Gloves and got my butt kicked in semi finals.Enlisted in service after HS. Sent to Vietnam and went to college on GI bill. Graduated BBA, went to work as trainee in large letter house insurance broker. Stayed there for over ten years and moved around to various brokers to vary my experience.Went through several mergers and acquisitions and got lucky a few times hitting VP at one of the top three firms in the USA. Traveled all over US and Asia. Had affiliation with Jardine Mathieson -Hong Kong. Landed at AON Corp after a merger and was working at the World Trade Center on 9/11. Lost many colleagues on that fateful day. Went back to work but it never was the same. Took early retirement--they gave me a great deal. Worked as a independent consultant for AON until they were back on their feet.
Married 2X, my second wife is also in insurance business. She is a hell of a lot smarter than me and successful. Have four daughters, four grandchildren.One of my daughters is also an insurance broker and on her way to a great career.
Got into racing from my Dad. He vacationed at Saratoga every summer for about 10 years.
Now lead the leisurely life, betting the ponies 3 or 4 days a week, play golf and fish in the warmer weather and despise the NY winters. May head down to Tampa to visit my bro and visit the track.Today it is 18 in NYC.

Bruddah
01-22-2011, 02:03 PM
BUT;

Married right out of high school to the most wonderful girl I have ever met in my life. She gave birth to my three sons. All are doing well.

She died from cancer at age 48 and I miss her every single day of my life. . I have managed to become an electrical inspector with a masters license (Master Electrician) in Balt. City/ County and the State of Maryland.

Daddy'O, you and your sons are living testimonials to your wifes wonderful spirit.

joanied
01-22-2011, 02:18 PM
Away from horse racing? Why would anyone have a life away from horse racing?

Seriously, horse racing and computers have been most of my life since I couldn't play black jack any more (1977). From then to now I have done a lot -

I spent years in the gaming industry as a dealer (craps and BJ, mostly, but could find my way around roulette as well), floorman and boxman.

I was a martial artist for 15 years - quit for 6 months and gained 40 pounds. Lost the edge forever.

Coached baseball at many levels, from 9-10 year olds, to men's amateur baseball, to high school and junior college.

Went to professional baseball umpires school.

Before horse racing there was playing pool for a living (not a good living, but a living), jumping out of airplanes and being a general tough guy in the jungle, a stint in the life insurance business. Oh, and I worked some of my way through high school dealing poker and blackjack in an illegal casino in Miami's Liberty City.

Worked three summers (ages 13-15) as a waiter at the Concord hotel in Kiamesha Lake, NY.


Boy, do I love this thread. What a great idea.

Dave... Nam?

johnhannibalsmith
01-22-2011, 02:35 PM
Hey NJ Stinks - you still have any pull over there? I never realized that there wasn't a standard deduction (it should be about 97%) for racehorse trainers and screwed up badly... How many certified letters do they send before...?... :sleeping:

This is a fun thread... I'm going to think up a real interesting life and then I'll be back to post...

joanied
01-22-2011, 02:35 PM
Originally Posted by mostpost
Education: Bachelor of Liberal Arts from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.

My brother went there after he attended New Paltz...maybe you guys knew each other! He majored in animal biology...and has been US Fish & Wildlife ever since.
By the way, visited him in Carbondale one time and thought it was horrible...more humidity than should be allowed!!

mostpost
01-22-2011, 03:25 PM
Originally Posted by mostpost
Education: Bachelor of Liberal Arts from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale.

My brother went there after he attended New Paltz...maybe you guys knew each other! He majored in animal biology...and has been US Fish & Wildlife ever since.
By the way, visited him in Carbondale one time and thought it was horrible...more humidity than should be allowed!!

I was at SIU from Jan. 1962 to June 1965. I lived at Saluki Hall, a small off campus dorm with about sixty inmates.... I mean residents. Does your brother fit in either or both those categories?
ETA What is New Paltz?

johnhannibalsmith
01-22-2011, 03:37 PM
...ETA What is New Paltz?


http://s3.amazonaws.com/picable/2008/05/27/170308_SUNY-New-Paltz-Tshirt-Amplifying_400.jpg

State U of NY College.... I think I saw Blues Traveler play in a gymnasium there in '90... maybe it was Stoneonta...

Tom
01-22-2011, 03:43 PM
maybe it was Stoneonta...

Been there, was that. :D

mountainman
01-22-2011, 04:56 PM
WOW ! I'm amazed at the response garnered for this thread. I belong to another forum related to gambling. This type of question has been tried off and on over the years. It dies quickly and any response is usually quick, as in : "GFY- this is a gambling forum. "

Timing is everything. And a provocative title helps.

joanied
01-22-2011, 06:54 PM
I was at SIU from Jan. 1962 to June 1965. I lived at Saluki Hall, a small off campus dorm with about sixty inmates.... I mean residents. Does your brother fit in either or both those categories?
ETA What is New Paltz?

:lol: now if I'd gone to college, I'd have been with the inmates:eek: ...but my bro, he'd be one of the residents...but no chance you knew him because he was still in high school back then...I'm the one turned loose in the world in '65 !

I see your question about New Paltz has been answered.

Ocala Mike
01-22-2011, 08:17 PM
OK, I gave a flip answer to this before, but I now see that I can't leave mostpost and NJ Stinks swinging in the wind. I, too, am a retired government worker and, worse yet, part of my career was spent as an income tax auditor for NY State AND as a public employee union member.

Details to follow, as they say on tv, and I'll try to put 69 years of my existence in summary form then. Right now, I've got to get my picks in for tonight's Meadowlands contest.




Ocala Mike

Fred
01-22-2011, 08:23 PM
Worked 37 years in the QSR (fast food) industry all with Long John Silvers as VP of operations with three different Franchisees. Born and raised in Martins Ferry, Oh (home of Lou Groza). Spent 9 years in Champaign, Il and the last 13 years in Knoxville, TN.
I retired July 31st of last year. My Daughter is a junior at the University of Illinois. Wife and I are still living in Knoxville. Ohio State and Steeler fan. And of course I love racing.

Freddy

Just want to add that I did serve my country from 67-69. Stationed in South Korea.

Also I should mention that I did hit the lottery-- The day I was born in the USA
Freddy

mostpost
01-22-2011, 09:09 PM
Just want to add that I did serve my country from 67-69. Stationed in South Korea.

Also I should mention that I did hit the lottery-- The day I was born in the USA
Freddy
Where were you stationed in South Korea? And when? I was in South Korea (though I'm sure Boxcar and a few others are convinced I served in North Korea) from late October 66 through Jan. 1968. I was stationed at EADC/EAR (Eighth Army Depot Command / Eighth Army Rear) which was in Taegu, Korea. Down in the southern third of the country. Any chance there was an overlap?

Ocala Mike
01-22-2011, 09:45 PM
OK, you asked for it.

I was born in Brooklyn, NY on the Sunday after Pearl Harbor (coincidentally, on that day the Bears and the Packers met for the last time in a PLAYOFF game, 12/14/41). I grew up in various NYC neighborhoods (Williamsburgh - Brooklyn, Corona - Queens, and Jamaica - Queens). My father was a professional musician, and played in the Stork Club band for many years during my growing-up period. He, in fact, is the person referred to in the Hitchcock movie, "The Wrong Man (1953)" as the horseplayer-friend of the main character in that film, Manny Balastrero, who was falsely arrested in a case of mistaken identity a year or two earlier.

I attended Jamaica High School and Queens College of the City University of New York (a hotbed of liberalism); I followed right-wing radio personality Michael Savage (Michael Weiner) by one year at those schools, but he's rich, and I'm writing my life story now on PA. Guess I shouldn't have listened to those commie teachers so much! Got a BA in English Lit. (useless!).

I played Freshman and Varsity baseball while at Queens College (1959-1963). Our best opponent school was St. John's, and they had a future major-league pitcher/coach by the name of Larry Bearnarth, now deceased.

I joined the USAF in early 1964, and served until 1968. Got out as a Captain (Communications Officer). Met my wife of 45 years while I was in the service, and she got to go over to Korea with me, 1966-1967, where I served as an advisor to the ROKAF on a base far south of the DMZ. I guess I was in Korea around the same time as Fred and mostpost, just before the Pueblo incident.

I worked for NY State from 1972-1996 when I lived in Deer Park, first at the Long Island State Park Commission, then as an auditor at the race tracks for the Department of Taxation and Finance, and finally as an Income Tax Auditor. NY, like the IRS, had its ground rules concerning audits which would probably shock most of you on here. My specialties were "snowbirds" for income tax cases and "employee vs. subcontractor" issues for withholding tax cases. I know full well where NJ Stinks is coming from. Best duty was 1977-1991 when I was a Pari-Mutuel Auditor and got to travel to racetracks all over the state (Saratoga, Finger Lakes, Yonkers, Roosevelt, etc.).

Retired and came down to Ocala, FL in 1996. Worked for the State of Florida briefly as a Child Support Enforcement Agent, but got harrassed out of there when I tried to organize the unit (found out the hard way what a "right to work" state really entails). From 2000-2007, I tried my hand as a thoroughbred breeder, and got a couple to win some cheap races after selling them. Not active in that any more; was investing $6-8K in getting a colt or filly ready for sale, and then selling it for $4-5K; can't survive that way.

Now, my wife and I are just taking it easy on our mini-farm with our part-time jobs, two dogs, two cats, and two horses (not TB's). She sells the programs at OBS ITW, and I delivery pharmacy at night. We have two children, both married, one living near us and one living in Utah. We have one grandson in Utah, and our biggest regret is we can't get to see him enough.


Ocala Mike

Ocala Mike
01-22-2011, 09:55 PM
mostpost, I was in Taejon, NW of you in Taegu around the same time you were there. I was with the 6146th Air Force Advisory Group (8/66-9/67) at K-5 ROKAF airbase. I brought my wife over "on the economy" because I had officially an unaccompanied tour. We lived in a Korean hotel off the Army Compound we were officially billeted at, called Stonestown, part of Humphries District Command.

I am quite familiar with Taegu, as that was the nearest "accompanied" area in Korea, and I considered extending my tour in order to bring my wife over, but wound up getting her there at my expense. Also, Taegu is where my boss, a LtCol, kept his wife while he fooled around with his young Korean girl friend up in Taejon!

I remember we would pay the hotel bill each month (maybe $150-200) in Korean won, and I would have stacks of money with me at the hotel front desk to pay it. I was only a 1st Lt. at the time; felt like "The Ugly American." I've got some pictures in a photo album of the officer's quarters at Taegu. Do you remember MPC?


Ocala Mike

thaskalos
01-22-2011, 10:02 PM
I am 49 years old...and have been in the grocery business since 1985.

I got interested in horseracing in 1981...when a friend persuaded me to go partners with him in the purchase of an Illinois-bred 2 year old. It did not prove to be a financially rewarding experience...but it was responsible for my love affair with this great game...which continues to this day.

I was married for 12 years, until Dec. 3rd, 2003...when my wife died, after a courageous 3.5 year battle with breast cancer...leaving me alone to care for our 5 year old son. She was 37 years old when she passed away...and her death threw my life into a tailspin from which I never thought that I would recover.

But, in the smile on my son's face, and in my memories of the strength that my wife showed in her fight against this dreaded disease, I found the courage to put the pieces of my life back together...and strive to give my son the sort of life that he deserves...

If I could give one piece of advice to all the husbands out there...it would be this:

Show as much love and appreciation as you can to your wives...they play a bigger role in your lives than you can imagine.

It's so unfortunate that some of us don't realize this, until it's too late...

Ocala Mike
01-22-2011, 10:12 PM
Well put, thaskalos. I am amazed and astounded by the "stream of consciousness" and pouring out of souls that this thread is producing. Props to mountainman for starting it.


Ocala Mike

Beachbabe
01-22-2011, 10:22 PM
I am 49 years old...and have been in the grocery business since 1985.

I got interested in horseracing in 1981...when a friend persuaded me to go partners with him in the purchase of an Illinois-bred 2 year old. It did not prove to be a financially rewarding experience...but it was responsible for my love affair with this great game...which continues to this day.

I was married for 12 years, until Dec. 3rd, 2003...when my wife died, after a courageous 3.5 year battle with breast cancer...leaving me alone to care for our 5 year old son. She was 37 years old when she passed away...and her death threw my life into a tailspin from which I never thought that I would recover.

But, in the smile on my son's face, and in my memories of the strength that my wife showed in her fight against this dreaded disease, I found the courage to put the pieces of my life back together...and strive to give my son the sort of life that he deserves...

If I could give one piece of advice to all the husbands out there...it would be this:

Show as much love and appreciation as you can to your wives...they play a bigger role in your lives than you can imagine.

It's so unfortunate that some of us don't realize this, until it's too late...


My heart goes out to you,Thaskalos. It's difficult enough to bring up a child with your spouse by your side...but to do it alone takes some special strength & resolve.
There's some men here who have lost their wives so, so early in life as I'm sure ther may be some women here that have experienced the same.
Thoughts & prayers to all of you

tzipi
01-22-2011, 11:07 PM
I am 49 years old...and have been in the grocery business since 1985.

I got interested in horseracing in 1981...when a friend persuaded me to go partners with him in the purchase of an Illinois-bred 2 year old. It did not prove to be a financially rewarding experience...but it was responsible for my love affair with this great game...which continues to this day.

I was married for 12 years, until Dec. 3rd, 2003...when my wife died, after a courageous 3.5 year battle with breast cancer...leaving me alone to care for our 5 year old son. She was 37 years old when she passed away...and her death threw my life into a tailspin from which I never thought that I would recover.

But, in the smile on my son's face, and in my memories of the strength that my wife showed in her fight against this dreaded disease, I found the courage to put the pieces of my life back together...and strive to give my son the sort of life that he deserves...

If I could give one piece of advice to all the husbands out there...it would be this:

Show as much love and appreciation as you can to your wives...they play a bigger role in your lives than you can imagine.

It's so unfortunate that some of us don't realize this, until it's too late...

That's a really nice post. :ThmbUp:

mountainman
01-22-2011, 11:21 PM
My deepest sympathies to those of you that have suffered loss. And my respect to all of you. I should have sensed from your postings what diverse and interesting lives you've led. Instead, subconsciously, I probably imagined you resembling your avatars. That's how stupid I can be.

Tom
01-22-2011, 11:25 PM
Instead, subconsciously, I probably imagined you resembling your avatars.

Hey!:eek:

mountainman
01-22-2011, 11:33 PM
Hey!:eek:

Yep. Sorry.

Donnie
01-22-2011, 11:41 PM
Ditto to what Mark said. This is a diverse bunch and I count my blessings. Strength to those of you who have faced tragedy and loss. My wife is my best friend. I would be totally lost without her.

I am glad so many have responded. It has been a very fun read. But Mark, who are you??

douglasw32
01-23-2011, 12:59 AM
42, wife 10 years younger, she loves handicapping horses with me (I can not be more blessed) we both work for the same company, healthcare in IT (server admin) .
We have 4 children 2yo, 4yo, 9yo and 11 and that goes girl boy, boy girl.

Own a small business fixing computers.

Quite a handful, mainly handicap as weekend warriors online.

Only interests are the kids (they keep me young), Work, and the horses.

illinoisbred
01-23-2011, 08:42 AM
Ditto to what Mark said. This is a diverse bunch and I count my blessings. Strength to those of you who have faced tragedy and loss. My wife is my best friend. I would be totally lost without her.

I am glad so many have responded. It has been a very fun read. But Mark, who are you??
Ditto to what Donnie said.Fascinating reading here and gives somewhat a picture to a name. Continued strength and well-being to all that suffered a loss. I joined here after suffering the loss of a parent who was a close confidant and handicapping partner for almost 30 years. It has proven to be one of the best things I've done!

Zman179
01-23-2011, 12:32 PM
Zman -- I'm envious.

I'll watch the local broadcast of the news from France that is on 3 times a week hoping to expand my vocabulary. A little latin and spanish helps but I need to acquire more of an ear for the spoken language. Oh well, just another interest that I don't have enought time to do correctly.

Don't be envious, you can do whatever you like to do (within reason of course). If you would really like to expand your vocabulary and if you have some time to spare, check out the San Diego chapter of Alliance Française. They have beginner classes once a week for two hours. http://afsandiego.org/cms/index.php/home
I still take classes at AF in NYC and it's a whole lot of fun.

This has been a great thread and I've learned one important thing. I've learned that if I ever have tax problems, I can hit up NJ Stinks for the Fed taxes and Ocala Mike for the state. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Hey Mountainman! You started this thread, what do YOU like to do outside of racing? Inquiring minds want to know.

Ocala Mike
01-23-2011, 01:13 PM
Any time, Zman179. By the way, I left out in my "life story" that I was an avid NYC Subway fan back in my youth. I logged a lot of hours riding next to the motorman's door looking out the front window on almost every subway line in the city back in the day. Does the 179 in your screen name refer, by any chance, to the 179th St. Jamaica terminal of the E and F trains on the IND? That was my "home" station between 1955-1965.


Ocala Mike

joanied
01-23-2011, 01:33 PM
Where were you stationed in South Korea? And when? I was in South Korea (though I'm sure Boxcar and a few others are convinced I served in North Korea) from late October 66 through Jan. 1968. I was stationed at EADC/EAR (Eighth Army Depot Command / Eighth Army Rear) which was in Taegu, Korea. Down in the southern third of the country. Any chance there was an overlap?

I knew someone stationed there within that timeframe...1966-67...he was a son of the great outrider at Belmont, Jim Dailey...his name was Jimmy Dailey...I even still have a photo of him over there...
does that name ring a bell for either of you guys?

chickenhead
01-23-2011, 02:31 PM
this guy, about 25 years later.

joanied
01-23-2011, 02:45 PM
Some of these stories have left me with tears in my eyes...those of you that have suffered the loss of a loved one touch the heart, and you have my sympathy and my admiration for getting yourself and those close to you through such saddness. Some very special folks here.

I'm 63 :eek: (how'd that happen!)...grew up a tom-boy running around the neighborhood in Bensonhurst, Bklyn...my dad, a WWII vet had a paint & wallpaper business on Coney Island Av. All my grandparents came over and through Ellis Island (one grandpa has his name on the wall there)...I'm of Irish & Italian bloodlines. My love for horses began as a kid in Bklyn, I guess riding the ponies at a place near the Verazzano Bridge, and the Steeplechase ride at Coney Island. The house in Bensonhurst was built by my mom's father in the late 1800's, and stood until only several years ago when some moron tore it down for an apartment building...I loved that house!
My folks moved us to Elmont and I attended Elmont Memorial HS...I got through school by the skin of my teeth, my art classes always kept my grade average at graduating level :D ...I hated school, and if I had liked it, could have attended F.I.T after graduation...but when we moved to Elmont I saw for the first time, Belmont Park and would hang out at the fenceline to see all the horses go by...from that first sight of the mighty grandstand, I knew what I wanted to do with my life...I think it was meant to be because I went to school with Jim Dailey's kids...he was a legend at Belmont...lead outrider (he brought Secretariat back after his Belmont win)...I drove his son Jimmy nuts asking about the track and wanting a job there...when there were no women working there...I was determined.
After graduation (age 17) I moved out on my own and my first great job was back in NYC...I had an apt in Queens, just off Jamacia Av. I worked for a womens clothing store chain doing window display...the main store was on 5th Av, near St. Patty's...but all I could think about was Belmont...I eventually got back in touch with Jimmy Dailey, met a friend of his and got my first job, walking hots for Ira Hanford...and married that friend of Jimmy's, a Viet Nam vet and one of the best exercise riders at Belmont. I did divorce him years later, and because of that, I left NY for good:( ...
I've lived in several states,coast to coast, best time was in Ocala on a horse farm there...it was wonderful and that started my 'dream' of having my own horses some day...
I was a crazy hippie back in the day...went to Woodstock, lived a hippie type life...including drugs, went to dozens of concerts and saw some of the great bands play...Woodstock is kind of a blur:D ...I was wild, crazy and independent...and strong enough to be one of the first gals working on the backside...and later i would do other men type jobs to earn a living...including working for Burlington-Northern RailRoad...along with one other gal and 35 guys, I tore up the old track and laid down the new...hardest job I ever had, but it was great.
I wanted back on the race track so decided to head for CA., wound up in WY. because my dad died and my mom wanted to live with me...couldn't drag her to CA and the track...at the time I was making a 6 mo stop in Colo. and worked on a ranch there, saving my $$ to get to CA. and SA...but when the ranch I was on moved up here to WY. I went with them...mom in tow...to make this part of my story short, I met and married my husband of 25 years...he was an oil field roughneck before he started to farm...when I met him I found out why I never had children, he lost the mother of his kids, she was killed, so when we married, I adopted them both, and now they are married and we have 5 grandchildren...
so I've been farming for the last 25 years, and it's about as hard an occupation you can have...but in that time period I was re united with the Champion Foolish Pleasure, and his owners gave me a few of their mares and I was able to live a dream and have my own horses...and foals. I called my operation 'Foolish Dream Farm'...bred the mares to QH stallions and had a great run for about 10 years...when I began to retire the mares, I sorta weaned myself from the business...I have horses I bred all over the country and Canada...I'm very proud of the foals I bred.(tha's one in my avatar)
Animals are my life long love...and the horses a passion I'll die with...I began following racing the day Carry Back won the Kentucky Derby...I still miss the track and I still miss having foals on the ground... but my life took me on a pretty good ride and although I have no race tracks nearby, we have a wonderful farm to live on, I'm surrounded by mountains and wildlife, married a good man, have good kids and grandkids, have animals in my life, we have 3 dogs, a goofy cat, my horses and guess I have to count the cows (ugh)...we work our butts off...but it keeps you fit, if nothing else!

Lots of other stuff I could include...but this is the basic story of 'who I am' :sleeping: hope it didn't put you to sleep:)

raybo
01-23-2011, 03:01 PM
Will be 62 in May, 1st SSA check should hit about July :jump:
Born in Paris, Ark. Moved to Texas at 6 weeks old, been a "Texan" ever since.
-Graduated high school, 6th in my class, attended UT Austin and Concordia Lutheran College, also in Austin.
-Joined the USAF in 1970, honorably discharged in 1977, avionics technician (A-7D, F4 "C"s and "D"s, C130 Gunships (Spectre), B57G) 2 tours in SE Asia (Thailand, can you say Thai Stick!?)
-Took a job as an apprentice draftsman for a custom millwork manufacturer, 8 years later I was production manager for the same company, remained there until 1993 when corporate downsizing got me released (filed bankrupsy shortly after, lost everything), went to truck driving school and drove longhaul for 4 years (sucked big time!!) went back to work in the millwork industry as a custom woodworker for a few years.
-Moved to Cedar Creek Lake, SE of Dallas, in 2004, played the ponies full time for a year, burned out, didn't look at racing for a year then got back into it after taking a regular job, to pay the bills, much less stress that way.
-Raised 3 kids, 1st is a teacher, masters in education, 2nd is married to the Army and in Germany, 3rd is in the Army, Cavalry Scout, will deploy to Iraq in March.
-Was a 3 sport athlete throughout school, then softball for 22 years, over 40 baseball for a year, threw the arm out completely, no more ball.
-Golfer, motocross rider(amateur only), crewed on a gas dragster for a season (great fun!)
-I guess, other than horse racing for 30+ years, my longest, most avid obsession is pool. Supported myself when I left the USAF by shooting pool at clubs in Tampa (shot a pretty good stick then , still shoot a pretty good stick today although bi-focals and pool suck alot).
-Been working on and messing with computers since 1970 (in the USAF)
-Love designing Excel spreadsheets, CADD, etc..

-That's the short list, lots more "stuff", (my "significant other" is less than half my age, quite a challenge but keeps me young)

mostpost
01-23-2011, 09:50 PM
mostpost, I was in Taejon, NW of you in Taegu around the same time you were there. I was with the 6146th Air Force Advisory Group (8/66-9/67) at K-5 ROKAF airbase. I brought my wife over "on the economy" because I had officially an unaccompanied tour. We lived in a Korean hotel off the Army Compound we were officially billeted at, called Stonestown, part of Humphries District Command.

I am quite familiar with Taegu, as that was the nearest "accompanied" area in Korea, and I considered extending my tour in order to bring my wife over, but wound up getting her there at my expense. Also, Taegu is where my boss, a LtCol, kept his wife while he fooled around with his young Korean girl friend up in Taejon!

I remember we would pay the hotel bill each month (maybe $150-200) in Korean won, and I would have stacks of money with me at the hotel front desk to pay it. I was only a 1st Lt. at the time; felt like "The Ugly American." I've got some pictures in a photo album of the officer's quarters at Taegu. Do you remember MPC?


Ocala Mike
There were two parts to the army base. Camp Henry, which was where the offices and PX and movie theater were. The different clubs (Lower four, top five, Officers were also located there. In a separate area about three mile away was Camp Walker. Camp Walker contained the enlisted man barracks the gym, housing for officers with families, a golf course, a small snack bar and a few other things.
If memory serves, K5 was within walking distance of Camp Walker. At least one of the fences bordering K5 was close at hand.
There was an orphanage located between K5 and Camp Walker. On Saturday afternoons myself and a friend would go to that orphanage and visit and play with the kids there. One of the most enjoyable parts of my stay in Korea.

mostpost
01-23-2011, 10:00 PM
I knew someone stationed there within that timeframe...1966-67...he was a son of the great outrider at Belmont, Jim Dailey...his name was Jimmy Dailey...I even still have a photo of him over there...
does that name ring a bell for either of you guys?
It does not with me. I find that as the years go by it is harder to remember even the people I worked with unless they were also friends.

If JD was at Camp Henry, where I was stationed, between Oct. 1966 and Jan. of 1968, I almost certainly ran into him. But, I recall no one by that name.

Beachbabe
01-23-2011, 10:02 PM
Some of these stories have left me with tears in my eyes...those of you that have suffered the loss of a loved one touch the heart, and you have my sympathy and my admiration for getting yourself and those close to you through such saddness. Some very special folks here.

I'm 63 :eek: (how'd that happen!)...grew up a tom-boy running around the neighborhood in Bensonhurst, Bklyn...my dad, a WWII vet had a paint & wallpaper business on Coney Island Av. All my grandparents came over and through Ellis Island (one grandpa has his name on the wall there)...I'm of Irish & Italian bloodlines. My love for horses began as a kid in Bklyn, I guess riding the ponies at a place near the Verazzano Bridge, and the Steeplechase ride at Coney Island. The house in Bensonhurst was built by my mom's father in the late 1800's, and stood until only several years ago when some moron tore it down for an apartment building...I loved that house!
My folks moved us to Elmont and I attended Elmont Memorial HS...I got through school by the skin of my teeth, my art classes always kept my grade average at graduating level :D ...I hated school, and if I had liked it, could have attended F.I.T after graduation...but when we moved to Elmont I saw for the first time, Belmont Park and would hang out at the fenceline to see all the horses go by...from that first sight of the mighty grandstand, I knew what I wanted to do with my life...I think it was meant to be because I went to school with Jim Dailey's kids...he was a legend at Belmont...lead outrider (he brought Secretariat back after his Belmont win)...I drove his son Jimmy nuts asking about the track and wanting a job there...when there were no women working there...I was determined.
After graduation (age 17) I moved out on my own and my first great job was back in NYC...I had an apt in Queens, just off Jamacia Av. I worked for a womens clothing store chain doing window display...the main store was on 5th Av, near St. Patty's...but all I could think about was Belmont...I eventually got back in touch with Jimmy Dailey, met a friend of his and got my first job, walking hots for Ira Hanford...and married that friend of Jimmy's, a Viet Nam vet and one of the best exercise riders at Belmont. I did divorce him years later, and because of that, I left NY for good:( ...
I've lived in several states,coast to coast, best time was in Ocala on a horse farm there...it was wonderful and that started my 'dream' of having my own horses some day...
I was a crazy hippie back in the day...went to Woodstock, lived a hippie type life...including drugs, went to dozens of concerts and saw some of the great bands play...Woodstock is kind of a blur:D ...I was wild, crazy and independent...and strong enough to be one of the first gals working on the backside...and later i would do other men type jobs to earn a living...including working for Burlington-Northern RailRoad...along with one other gal and 35 guys, I tore up the old track and laid down the new...hardest job I ever had, but it was great.
I wanted back on the race track so decided to head for CA., wound up in WY. because my dad died and my mom wanted to live with me...couldn't drag her to CA and the track...at the time I was making a 6 mo stop in Colo. and worked on a ranch there, saving my $$ to get to CA. and SA...but when the ranch I was on moved up here to WY. I went with them...mom in tow...to make this part of my story short, I met and married my husband of 25 years...he was an oil field roughneck before he started to farm...when I met him I found out why I never had children, he lost the mother of his kids, she was killed, so when we married, I adopted them both, and now they are married and we have 5 grandchildren...
so I've been farming for the last 25 years, and it's about as hard an occupation you can have...but in that time period I was re united with the Champion Foolish Pleasure, and his owners gave me a few of their mares and I was able to live a dream and have my own horses...and foals. I called my operation 'Foolish Dream Farm'...bred the mares to QH stallions and had a great run for about 10 years...when I began to retire the mares, I sorta weaned myself from the business...I have horses I bred all over the country and Canada...I'm very proud of the foals I bred.(tha's one in my avatar)
Animals are my life long love...and the horses a passion I'll die with...I began following racing the day Carry Back won the Kentucky Derby...I still miss the track and I still miss having foals on the ground... but my life took me on a pretty good ride and although I have no race tracks nearby, we have a wonderful farm to live on, I'm surrounded by mountains and wildlife, married a good man, have good kids and grandkids, have animals in my life, we have 3 dogs, a goofy cat, my horses and guess I have to count the cows (ugh)...we work our butts off...but it keeps you fit, if nothing else!

Lots of other stuff I could include...but this is the basic story of 'who I am' :sleeping: hope it didn't put you to sleep:)


Love your story, Joanie. :ThmbUp:

Zman179
01-23-2011, 10:17 PM
Any time, Zman179. By the way, I left out in my "life story" that I was an avid NYC Subway fan back in my youth. I logged a lot of hours riding next to the motorman's door looking out the front window on almost every subway line in the city back in the day. Does the 179 in your screen name refer, by any chance, to the 179th St. Jamaica terminal of the E and F trains on the IND? That was my "home" station between 1955-1965.


Ocala Mike

Actually it does. ;)

cosmo96
01-23-2011, 10:21 PM
I retired from General Motors after forty years, a union rep for twenty-five. I now work for First Transit transporting disabled people. I graduated from Wright State University in 1993. I majored in Sociology. I have three children, five grandchildren. I am a practicing Catholic. My son is a Marinist brother at the University of Dayton. My youngest son graduated from UD. My daughter has a Masters Degree from UD. I have been married for forty-three years. My other hobbies besides horseracing, all sports, computers, watching movies, phtography, traveling, reading, and hiking. I am a liberal Democrat, but not always pleased with Obama. I love bluegrass and old time country music. My favorite team is the Cincinnati Reds. I was a devout Reds fan since I was four years old.

lamboguy
01-23-2011, 10:24 PM
hey jonied, you ought to get together with my wife, she's never met a homeless cat that she didn't love. she loves them so much i have a house full of them. some of her cats have their own private rooms with their own television set playing all day watching animal planet. not only that she watches all the horses that get claimed away from and makes sure they have a home after they are done racing.

Ocala Mike
01-23-2011, 10:58 PM
mostpost, when you say K-5, I think you mean K-2. K-2 was the designator for Taegu AB, while K-5 was Taejon AB, where the Communications-Electronics School for ROKAF was located. Our unit, the 6146th Air Force Advisory Group, did have a presence in Taegu, known as Detachment 5.

One of my additional duties was to teach English to the Korean AF students at the C-E School in Taejon. Another additional duty I had was that of Civic Action Officer, and my wife and I took great pleasure in aiding and assisting a local orphange. I have some great photos of our efforts along those lines (transporting kids and livestock in AF trucks, for example), as well as some photos of the Camp Henry area where you were.


Ocala Mike

Ocala Mike
01-23-2011, 11:02 PM
Zman179, one of my unfulfilled goals in life was to "accidentally" fall asleep at the end of the line on an "E" or "F" train and check out the "yard" where the tracks extended well beyond 179th St., and seemed to drop down another level. Never got to do it.


Ocala Mike

joanied
01-23-2011, 11:23 PM
Zman179, one of my unfulfilled goals in life was to "accidentally" fall asleep at the end of the line on an "E" or "F" train and check out the "yard" where the tracks extended well beyond 179th St., and seemed to drop down another level. Never got to do it.


Ocala Mike

:lol: I did that...I really can't recall E or F, but it was the end of the line and I was not happy!!

joanied
01-23-2011, 11:28 PM
It does not with me. I find that as the years go by it is harder to remember even the people I worked with unless they were also friends.

If JD was at Camp Henry, where I was stationed, between Oct. 1966 and Jan. of 1968, I almost certainly ran into him. But, I recall no one by that name.

Ya never know, worth a shot at askin'...I don't know where Jimmy was over there...I do remember he joined right out of HS to aviod getting shipped to Nam...my ex husband was in Nam...he breezed through boot camp because he was so damned fit from getting on horses every morning...
anyway, thanks for the reply.
By the way, we support the military and I give $$ to several vet organization...my husband is really into military history...

mostpost
01-23-2011, 11:30 PM
mostpost, when you say K-5, I think you mean K-2. K-2 was the designator for Taegu AB, while K-5 was Taejon AB, where the Communications-Electronics School for ROKAF was located. Our unit, the 6146th Air Force Advisory Group, did have a presence in Taegu, known as Detachment 5.

One of my additional duties was to teach English to the Korean AF students at the C-E School in Taejon. Another additional duty I had was that of Civic Action Officer, and my wife and I took great pleasure in aiding and assisting a local orphange. I have some great photos of our efforts along those lines (transporting kids and livestock in AF trucks, for example), as well as some photos of the Camp Henry area where you were.


Ocala Mike
It isn't a task at all, is it? It is a great pleasure. It amazed me that while riding from Kimpo to the barracks where we spent the first night, there were guys complaining about how much they hated the country (South Korea). I was thinking, "What is the matter with you? You haven't spent a single night here." I always tried to see the best in any place. There is an austere beauty to many parts of Korea. I enjoyed my time there because I made up my mind to do so early on. I'm sorry I was never able to return.

joanied
01-23-2011, 11:30 PM
Love your story, Joanie. :ThmbUp:

Thanks, Beachbabe:blush:

magwell
01-23-2011, 11:30 PM
I'm consumed by the greatest and toughest game played outdoors and wouldn't want it any other way......:cool: Since everybody is fessing up I did 4 years in the Coast Guard and just about everything on the track but being a jockey and a vet, have 2 kids, one is a CPA and the other is a Doctor, have 4 grandchildren all in college, I believe work is only work, when you'd rather be doing something else..... :cool:

NJ Stinks
01-24-2011, 01:24 AM
Any time, Zman179. By the way, I left out in my "life story" that I was an avid NYC Subway fan back in my youth. I logged a lot of hours riding next to the motorman's door looking out the front window on almost every subway line in the city back in the day. Does the 179 in your screen name refer, by any chance, to the 179th St. Jamaica terminal of the E and F trains on the IND? That was my "home" station between 1955-1965.


Ocala Mike


Actually it does. ;)


I can't get over the fact that Ocala Mike figured out the Zman's username. This thread really is astounding. :ThmbUp: :ThmbUp:

jognlope
01-24-2011, 09:45 AM
Was in QA for hospitals, an HMO, reporter for a Framingham, MA newspaper long ago after graduating in journalism. I enjoy the health care field, at home transriptionist now. Love horses, racing, love my parrot and kitties. After my boyfriend and I moved from NYC to PA, found our first horse, I would walk to the barn and see him and then come back to the trailer and write. I finished a novel about a guy who'd been walking for years and then at the last minute ws canned and lost his pension, and this led to a murder in the woods!, but it was a "drawer novel," one you just put in a drawer cuz it's your first one and not one you send to a publisher. Maybe one day I'll rewrite it or try another idea. After I get my gallbladder out :(. Enjoying reading these.

Ocala Mike
01-24-2011, 10:23 AM
I can't get over the fact that Ocala Mike figured out the Zman's username. This thread really is astounding. :ThmbUp: :ThmbUp:

It's my Tax Auditor training, NJ. Used to do residency and indirect audits on non-filers where we were more like detectives than auditors. Glad that's all behind me now; I was never really comfortable in the role. Only wish the training could help me in doping out the horses better (it doesn't!).


Ocala Mike

Zman179
01-24-2011, 10:33 AM
Zman179, one of my unfulfilled goals in life was to "accidentally" fall asleep at the end of the line on an "E" or "F" train and check out the "yard" where the tracks extended well beyond 179th St., and seemed to drop down another level. Never got to do it.
Ocala Mike

Believe me Mike, you didn't miss a whole lot except a whole bunch of darkness. :D

:lol: I did that...I really can't recall E or F, but it was the end of the line and I was not happy!!

Be honest, did you have a hard day at work, or did you have one or four too many drinks? :p

I can't get over the fact that Ocala Mike figured out the Zman's username. This thread really is astounding. :ThmbUp: :ThmbUp:

Oh great, now I'm gonna have to come up with a new number. :lol:

It's my Tax Auditor training, NJ. Used to do residency and indirect audits on non-filers where we were more like detectives than auditors. Glad that's all behind me now; I was never really comfortable in the role. Only wish the training could help me in doping out the horses better (it doesn't!).

Are you SURE you're staying in retirement? I mean like REALLY sure? :lol: :lol:

Fred
01-24-2011, 11:25 AM
Where were you stationed in South Korea? And when? I was in South Korea (though I'm sure Boxcar and a few others are convinced I served in North Korea) from late October 66 through Jan. 1968. I was stationed at EADC/EAR (Eighth Army Depot Command / Eighth Army Rear) which was in Taegu, Korea. Down in the southern third of the country. Any chance there was an overlap?

I was with HQ25th if I remember correctly. Somewhere around Uijongbu but spent most of my time TDY at Camp Santa Barbarbra close to the DMZ.

I served there from Nov 1967- Jan 1969

Freddy

Ocala Mike
01-24-2011, 11:59 AM
Are you SURE you're staying in retirement? I mean like REALLY sure? :lol: :lol:


Yeah, I'm through except for delivering meds part-time to local nursing homes; have to stay active so I don't wind up in one of them.

My auditing days are over; I audited some pretty noteworthy people back in the early 90's for NY State: Dick Clark ("American Bandstand"), Tim Rooney (Yonkers Raceway owner), George Strawbridge (Augustin Stable owner), and Hodding Carter III (Jimmy Carter cabinet member) among others. I was only the third best producer in our tax office; buddy of mine got to audit Martha Stewart. Before you ask, MY LIPS ARE SEALED!


Ocala Mike

DJofSD
01-24-2011, 12:24 PM
Don't be envious, you can do whatever you like to do (within reason of course). If you would really like to expand your vocabulary and if you have some time to spare, check out the San Diego chapter of Alliance Française. They have beginner classes once a week for two hours. http://afsandiego.org/cms/index.php/home
I still take classes at AF in NYC and it's a whole lot of fun.


Thanks, Zman179. I would love to be able to do something like this.

Many years ago, I took an beginners class UCSD extension. It was fun and the instructor was very good. However, I seemed to be struggling a lot more than most every one else. Finally, toward the end of the term, there was a round table for all to share their reasons being in the class and what they hoped to get out of it. Oh boy, was that an insight. Most every one had already had two years in high school, or, college level classes. Some had actually attended college at one of the colleges in Paris, or, lived and worked in France. So, I was the straggler, far back, out of touch with the field.

mountainman
01-24-2011, 02:00 PM
I am glad so many have responded. It has been a very fun read. But Mark, who are you??

I'm a native Pennsylvanian who was raised in an extremely dysfunctional home. Not surprisingly, I developed a chip on my shoulder that, unfortunately, is still there today. My outlet was baseball, and as an intimidating fastball pitcher, I was getting feelers from pro scouts when a freak injury ruined my arm-and nearly cost me my life.

After that, it was racing, racing, racing, an interest passed down from my dad. I was rebellious, saw no point in formal education, and went on to spend my 20's handicapping for guys that muttered from the side of their mouths and carried small fortunes in their pockets. Some of them are now guests of the state.

Considering that dubious background, I was fortunate in 1989 to be taken on as a racing official. I fell in love with the job, made myself useful, and what was to be a six-week stint filling in for a guy on vacation has turned into a satisfying career. I'm a classic workaholic with experience as a claims clerk, placing judge, paddock judge, identifier, clocker, teletime operator, racing secretary, ast. racing secretary, substitute steward, clerk of scales, linesmaker..etc. Jack of all trades as an official, but master of none.

My career took an unexpected turn in the late 90's when Chris Lincoln came to do our wv derby on espn and tapped me as his analyst. I'd just lost my mother to a cruel form of lung cancer and I was a mess. She was my best friend and biggest supporter. Frances Marie Patterson had also been a hardcore horseplayer and as airtime approached, I felt her absence keenly. I wept. Chis Lincoln got me through it. The man's confidence, strong presence and exquisite timing made a completely inexperienced partner come off passably on tv.

My main regret about mom isn't that she never saw me on tv-although, the dropout son who caused her so much heartache still dedicates every show to her. It's that she couldn't watch Shane grow up. He's my mildly autistic 16-yr old. I share custody with his mom, and love him more than life. Shane attends mainstream school, is acutely intelligent, and has made great strides. He is brave, but apprehensive about his future.

During free time not spent with Shane, I lift weights, play hoops, and consume junkfood. I'm a nonsmoker and very moderate drinker who intends this year to finally beat the bulge. I also like to write and am outlining a first novel that I probably lack the talent to pull off.

Just one more thing before I conclude. My mother's maiden name was Shane.

joanied
01-24-2011, 02:36 PM
quote from Zman179-
"Be honest, did you have a hard day at work, or did you have one or four too many drinks? :p"


:lol: probably did have a hard day at work (at the time I was catching the subway from Queens to NYC for my job as a store window display person)...but no, not too many drinks...too many tokes:eek:

joanied
01-24-2011, 02:44 PM
hey jonied, you ought to get together with my wife, she's never met a homeless cat that she didn't love. she loves them so much i have a house full of them. some of her cats have their own private rooms with their own television set playing all day watching animal planet. not only that she watches all the horses that get claimed away from and makes sure they have a home after they are done racing.

lambo...your wife goes the extra mile:ThmbUp: ...can't say that our kitty watches TV(our dgos do that):D ...I've always had cats, but my last real inside cat passed away a few years ago, and since my husband is alergic, I won't have anymore inside...but the kitty we have, she wandered onto the farm about 12 years ago, I think she's gotta be 15 years old, but is so full of life...she learned to use the doggie door, so she comes & goes, loves hanging with the dogs and leads a life or Riley here...my father in law has probably 25 cats at his place...all ages...it's a hoot. It's easy to have a lot of outside cats here on the farms...and they are all lucky cats because they have it all...food, water, lots of cool places to explore, mice and other little critters to hunt, plenty of shelter...
I admire your wife for making sure your horses get good homes, lambo...I think you and your wife are very wonderful folks...you make a difference in this world:ThmbUp:

joanied
01-24-2011, 02:56 PM
Hey, mountainman...good to 'meet' you :) ...loved reading your story, and I think you & me would get along really well...I too was a reble...the family 'black sheep' and always beat my own drum...didn't mention it before, but I also did some 'time' :eek: and did it well.
Disfunctional families...way too many these days, back in the day we did have real families, not leave it to beaver types, but still mom stayed home, dad worked and dinner had everyone at the table...
my family wasn't very functional either...dad was a stone cold alcholic, and it killed him at age 58...and he wasn't a good drunk either, I kinda took it all because I was the oldest, but thankfully I was strong enough to get through it and not have it effect the rest of my life in a negative way...he was a good man, but he was Irish and his 5 years over seas during WWII really screwed with him...so, I finally forgave him.

You done good with your life, mountainman...either of us could have gone down that dead end road to nowhere....yet, with all the bumps and road blocks, we made it to the high road:jump:

mountainman
01-24-2011, 03:17 PM
Hey, mountainman...good to 'meet' you :) ...loved reading your story, and I think you & me would get along really well...I too was a reble...the family 'black sheep' and always beat my own drum...didn't mention it before, but I also did some 'time' :eek: and did it well.
Disfunctional families...way too many these days, back in the day we did have real families, not leave it to beaver types, but still mom stayed home, dad worked and dinner had everyone at the table...
my family wasn't very functional either...dad was a stone cold alcholic, and it killed him at age 58...and he wasn't a good drunk either, I kinda took it all because I was the oldest, but thankfully I was strong enough to get through it and not have it effect the rest of my life in a negative way...he was a good man, but he was Irish and his 5 years over seas during WWII really screwed with him...so, I finally forgave him.

You done good with your life, mountainman...either of us could have gone down that dead end road to nowhere....yet, with all the bumps and road blocks, we made it to the high road:jump:
Tx for sharing, Joanie. I'd planned to avoid posting my story, but the outpouring on this thread shamed me into it.

joanied
01-24-2011, 03:22 PM
mountainman...

I wanted to add...the story of your mom touched my heart...and I have a nephew just like your Shane...he's over come so much with his Autism, it's remarkable...the 'experts' wanted my brother to put Connor in a 'special' school, but he wouldn't do it and Connor does great in a regular school...good grades and when other kids get mean with him, he deals with it like a champ...he says things like, words can't harm me, or he says he feels sad for kids that want to be mean...children that are Autistic can be truly remarkable.
Give Shane a hug from me:)

joanied
01-24-2011, 03:58 PM
Tx for sharing, Joanie. I'd planned to avoid posting my story, but the outpouring on this thread shamed me into it.

:D I wasn't planning on adding my story either...but in reading everyone else's, thought, what the hell.
As it happens, your story is pretty incredible and IMO, there is no shame to it!

Sometimes sharing stories like the ones within this thread isn't a bad thing...if a story has words and or experiences that can help someone else, in any small way, then that story has been worth telling.

thaskalos
01-24-2011, 07:18 PM
I also like to write and am outlining a first novel that I probably lack the talent to pull off.
The "smart" money says you are wrong...:ThmbUp:

TrifectaMike
01-24-2011, 10:24 PM
:D I wasn't planning on adding my story either...but in reading everyone else's, thought, what the hell.
As it happens, your story is pretty incredible and IMO, there is no shame to it!

Sometimes sharing stories like the ones within this thread isn't a bad thing...if a story has words and or experiences that can help someone else, in any small way, then that story has been worth telling.

Joanied,

During your time at Belmont did you know John Campo, John Parisella, Frank Tufariello, Mike DePompo, or Joseph D'Angelo? All were and are friends of mine.

Let me not leave out Mike Miceli, Richard Miglioreand Nick Santagata and Gelardi (Are these guys all Italian).

Mike

nijinski
01-24-2011, 11:17 PM
It's my Tax Auditor training, NJ. Used to do residency and indirect audits on non-filers where we were more like detectives than auditors. Glad that's all behind me now; I was never really comfortable in the role. Only wish the training could help me in doping out the horses better (it doesn't!).


Ocala Mike

And I never would have thought the horses were evading their taxes . ;)

mountainman
01-24-2011, 11:27 PM
mountainman...


Give Shane a hug from me:)

Tx Joanie. I would if Shane accepted hugs... lol...
btw-Connor sounds like a great kid. I wish him a good life.

nijinski
01-24-2011, 11:53 PM
Mountainman , I have twins in my family who are classified and are slowly
mainstreaming in school. I see all the setbacks they endure and our family
is working hard on their self esteem as other kids can be cruel.
I'm trying to get them into a program this spring with other youths working
with and riding horses. I've seen them around the horses before and they
appear very focused around them.
I wondered if you have tried something like this with Shane , although it does sound like he is doing well , there is something about these large beautiful animals that they have a special bonding with our amazing kids.

senortout
01-25-2011, 12:03 AM
I'm a native Pennsylvanian who was raised in an extremely dysfunctional home. Not surprisingly, I developed a chip on my shoulder that, unfortunately, is still there today. My outlet was baseball, and as an intimidating fastball pitcher, I was getting feelers from pro scouts when a freak injury ruined my arm-and nearly cost me my life.

After that, it was racing, racing, racing, an interest passed down from my dad. I was rebellious, saw no point in formal education, and went on to spend my 20's handicapping for guys that muttered from the side of their mouths and carried small fortunes in their pockets. Some of them are now guests of the state.

Considering that dubious background, I was fortunate in 1989 to be taken on as a racing official. I fell in love with the job, made myself useful, and what was to be a six-week stint filling in for a guy on vacation has turned into a satisfying career. I'm a classic workaholic with experience as a claims clerk, placing judge, paddock judge, identifier, clocker, teletime operator, racing secretary, ast. racing secretary, substitute steward, clerk of scales, linesmaker..etc. Jack of all trades as an official, but master of none.

My career took an unexpected turn in the late 90's when Chris Lincoln came to do our wv derby on espn and tapped me as his analyst. I'd just lost my mother to a cruel form of lung cancer and I was a mess. She was my best friend and biggest supporter. Frances Marie Patterson had also been a hardcore horseplayer and as airtime approached, I felt her absence keenly. I wept. Chis Lincoln got me through it. The man's confidence, strong presence and exquisite timing made a completely inexperienced partner come off passably on tv.

My main regret about mom isn't that she never saw me on tv-although, the dropout son who caused her so much heartache still dedicates every show to her. It's that she couldn't watch Shane grow up. He's my mildly autistic 16-yr old. I share custody with his mom, and love him more than life. Shane attends mainstream school, is acutely intelligent, and has made great strides. He is brave, but apprehensive about his future.

During free time not spent with Shane, I lift weights, play hoops, and consume junkfood. I'm a nonsmoker and very moderate drinker who intends this year to finally beat the bulge. I also like to write and am outlining a first novel that I probably lack the talent to pull off.

Just one more thing before I conclude. My mother's maiden name was Shane.

MM, I do enjoy the banter the two of you put forth on the Mountaineer feed! (said that first so I wouldn't forget to)

You are all invited to put the name Spencer Byers in a You Tube search. He is my grandson, and he can bring it! Second year high school, been playing in leagues since he could pick up a bat. Ps I've been told his mechanics are excellent(what do you think Mountainman?)

Thomas Byers(senortout) age 74, retired 2001 ex grocery store mgr. *saw another in here who plys that trade(Thaskalos)....that job brought me out of my shell so to speak. And now having said that, can't think of too many other good points to the job...was just hard for me. I finally discovered I wasn't cut out for management. Didn't have the finesse to pull it off. Spent the last few years of my career as a receiving clerk. Less pay but a whole lot less stress. And the people I met along the way were really good to me, I thank them all.

My wife Margo retired a few years before I did. She was in poor health and passed quite unexpectedly one day, Nov of 2005. I miss her and of course the kids miss her. My son Dan has the ballplayer, and only child, broken home unfortunately. My daughter has 2 girls and a boy all grown now. Very broken home. Margo and I raised the three of them. Our daughter Michelle is pretty much out of the woods now and helping more, which is good.

I'd like to say something about our country now just in passing. I am a Democrat who nearly always votes the ticket. Back in Nixons time, I did cross the line, the first time. I have strong feelings about good and bad. I have struggled with my feelings about all politicians recently. We need a straight shooter in office. Last straight shooter we had in office?
I invite your comments, cause I have one in mind. I want you to say the name first!

This note about who I am would not be complete without mentioning the thoroughbred race horse. I fell in love with the game in 1973. Duh!
Maybe someone who is just noticing our sport has already fallen in love due to Zenyatta.....lookout, keep it real now. Yah Horse of the Year!

I do hope you all enjoy the game half as much as I do, sometimes I think its what keeps me going.

Tom

Ocala Mike
01-25-2011, 12:14 AM
We need a straight shooter in office. Last straight shooter we had in office?


Tom


Easy, and this is coming from a lifelong Democrat. Dwight David Eisenhower, in his speech of 50 years ago warning us about the approaching military-industrial complex. If only we had listened.


Ocala Mike

senortout
01-25-2011, 12:24 AM
Easy, and this is coming from a lifelong Democrat. Dwight David Eisenhower, in his speech of 50 years ago warning us about the approaching military-industrial complex. If only we had listened.


Ocala Mike

I liked Ike!

JustRalph
01-25-2011, 01:23 AM
I'm a death row inmate with a 4G cell phone. Been posting here for years via the Warden's computer.

joanied
01-25-2011, 02:16 PM
Tx Joanie. I would if Shane accepted hugs... lol...
btw-Connor sounds like a great kid. I wish him a good life.

Thanks...same for Shane:)

joanied
01-25-2011, 02:23 PM
Joanied,

During your time at Belmont did you know John Campo, John Parisella, Frank Tufariello, Mike DePompo, or Joseph D'Angelo? All were and are friends of mine.

Let me not leave out Mike Miceli, Richard Miglioreand Nick Santagata and Gelardi (Are these guys all Italian).

Mike

Of the ones you mentioned, I only really knew Campo...spent a lot of time at his barn, my ex husband galloped horses for him...there was never a dull moment when you were around Campo...I think he was Rick Dutrow of yesterday:D ...had a lot of fun at that barn....and it was always a learning experience watching him with the horses...

The others, a few I knew in passing.

andicap
01-25-2011, 02:56 PM
Id say Harry S. Truman (The S. stood for S.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman

Just read a fascinating chapter about him in Michael Beschloss' book about presidents -- it was about his decision to recognize Israel in 1948 even though most of his advisers were against it and he was a border-line Anti-Semite. He never card what anyone thought --- he just shot straight from the hip. You may not have agreed with him on everything, but you knew where he stood.



MM, I do enjoy the banter the two of you put forth on the Mountaineer feed! (said that first so I wouldn't forget to)

You are all invited to put the name Spencer Byers in a You Tube search. He is my grandson, and he can bring it! Second year high school, been playing in leagues since he could pick up a bat. Ps I've been told his mechanics are excellent(what do you think Mountainman?)

Thomas Byers(senortout) age 74, retired 2001 ex grocery store mgr. *saw another in here who plys that trade(Thaskalos)....that job brought me out of my shell so to speak. And now having said that, can't think of too many other good points to the job...was just hard for me. I finally discovered I wasn't cut out for management. Didn't have the finesse to pull it off. Spent the last few years of my career as a receiving clerk. Less pay but a whole lot less stress. And the people I met along the way were really good to me, I thank them all.

My wife Margo retired a few years before I did. She was in poor health and passed quite unexpectedly one day, Nov of 2005. I miss her and of course the kids miss her. My son Dan has the ballplayer, and only child, broken home unfortunately. My daughter has 2 girls and a boy all grown now. Very broken home. Margo and I raised the three of them. Our daughter Michelle is pretty much out of the woods now and helping more, which is good.

I'd like to say something about our country now just in passing. I am a Democrat who nearly always votes the ticket. Back in Nixons time, I did cross the line, the first time. I have strong feelings about good and bad. I have struggled with my feelings about all politicians recently. We need a straight shooter in office. Last straight shooter we had in office?
I invite your comments, cause I have one in mind. I want you to say the name first!

This note about who I am would not be complete without mentioning the thoroughbred race horse. I fell in love with the game in 1973. Duh!
Maybe someone who is just noticing our sport has already fallen in love due to Zenyatta.....lookout, keep it real now. Yah Horse of the Year!

I do hope you all enjoy the game half as much as I do, sometimes I think its what keeps me going.

Tom

joanied
01-25-2011, 04:34 PM
Mountainman , I have twins in my family who are classified and are slowly
mainstreaming in school. I see all the setbacks they endure and our family
is working hard on their self esteem as other kids can be cruel.
I'm trying to get them into a program this spring with other youths working
with and riding horses. I've seen them around the horses before and they
appear very focused around them.
I wondered if you have tried something like this with Shane , although it does sound like he is doing well , there is something about these large beautiful animals that they have a special bonding with our amazing kids.

There is something about horses that seem to help these special needs kids, and the programs they have for handicapped children learning toride are outstanding...
my nephew Connor is now 13 years old, when he was growing up and my brother came to visit, first thing for Connor was a visit with the horses...of course, he had no fear of these big creatures, and thankfully my mares (and their foals) were people friendly and I trusted them 100% around Connor...if they were out in the pasture, we'd go out there and he'd stand behind them, under their tails, he'd get under neath them, he'd lay down with a napping foal, one time he watched a foal nursing, then decided to try doing it himself...wish I'd had a photo of that...the mare simply turned her head to see what that was under her udder...
I beleive that horses do help the handicapped...
here's a (bad) photo of Connor when he was just a wee-one (his older brother and my brother are in the photo, but you can tell which is Connor).

Donnie
01-26-2011, 12:15 AM
To all who have shared in their challenges that life has thrown you:

There is reason why you have been given the special people in your lives. Your strength and compassion are your strengths and you all know how to play to your strengths. I stand humbled. God bless you all!

Mark-- thanks for sharing your story as well. I hope to someday make it to MNR and meet you in person! Good luck with your new life goals....2 years ago I committed to get back into shape. It has to become a lifestyle. Sounds like you were there before; you'll do it!

Grits
01-26-2011, 01:45 AM
Joanie and Donnie, its time for sleep now, its late. This is a good, good end to the day.

I've not replied to this thread--I've felt I didn't have much to offer.

Who am I?

My answer is a simple one. "Mom".

nijinski
01-26-2011, 01:51 AM
There is something about horses that seem to help these special needs kids, and the programs they have for handicapped children learning toride are outstanding...
my nephew Connor is now 13 years old, when he was growing up and my brother came to visit, first thing for Connor was a visit with the horses...of course, he had no fear of these big creatures, and thankfully my mares (and their foals) were people friendly and I trusted them 100% around Connor...if they were out in the pasture, we'd go out there and he'd stand behind them, under their tails, he'd get under neath them, he'd lay down with a napping foal, one time he watched a foal nursing, then decided to try doing it himself...wish I'd had a photo of that...the mare simply turned her head to see what that was under her udder...
I beleive that horses do help the handicapped...
here's a (bad) photo of Connor when he was just a wee-one (his older brother and my brother are in the photo, but you can tell which is Connor).
Beautiful photo Joanied , oh and I wish you had a photo of that classic moment also.

Dave Schwartz
01-26-2011, 02:20 AM
There is something about horses that seem to help these special needs kids, and the programs they have for handicapped children learning toride are outstanding...

Not just kids.

I absolutely fell in love with the equine group when I was in my early 40s. I'd already been chasing horses for 20 years by then but never really appreciated the animal.

I had moved to an area on the southern edge of Reno and woke up one day to find a band of wild horses on my lawn. Man, I could just watch them for hours - especially in their native habitat.

Riding is even better.

mostpost
01-26-2011, 02:42 AM
Joanie and Donnie, its time for sleep now, its late. This is a good, good end to the day.

I've not replied to this thread--I've felt I didn't have much to offer.

Who am I?

My answer is a simple one. "Mom".
So wrong. You have everything to offer. "Mom" Three letters that mean everthing to everyone. Thank you.

senortout
01-26-2011, 03:37 AM
Id say Harry S. Truman (The S. stood for S.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman

Just read a fascinating chapter about him in Michael Beschloss' book about presidents -- it was about his decision to recognize Israel in 1948 even though most of his advisers were against it and he was a border-line Anti-Semite. He never card what anyone thought --- he just shot straight from the hip. You may not have agreed with him on everything, but you knew where he stood.


HARRY S. TRUMAN

joanied
01-26-2011, 11:22 AM
Beautiful photo Joanied , oh and I wish you had a photo of that classic moment also.

Thanks, nijinski.... bad photo, but wonderful moment:)

joanied
01-26-2011, 11:29 AM
Not just kids.

I absolutely fell in love with the equine group when I was in my early 40s. I'd already been chasing horses for 20 years by then but never really appreciated the animal.

I had moved to an area on the southern edge of Reno and woke up one day to find a band of wild horses on my lawn. Man, I could just watch them for hours - especially in their native habitat.

Riding is even better.

That is so cool. We have a couple of herds of Mustangs close by here...the McCullough Peaks Mustangs and the Pryor Mountain Mustangs...the Pryor's are fairly easy to find and watch, the others a little tougher...all are great veiwing, especially in the Spring when there are foals...they do very well here and are managed well...but since the adopt a Mustang programs have been having a hard time the last couple of years (the economy mess) they are now using birth control on both herds...they shoot the 'medication' into the horses using dart guns, and this program works well at keeping herds managable...which they have to do, if not, the Mustangs may become a part of the past, and that would be a total bummer.
By the way, great photo of a couple of black mustangs on the front page of the local paper yesterday.

mostpost
08-16-2013, 01:11 AM
I ran across this thread while looking for something else. A lot of very interesting stories. I thought I would bump it up for three reasons.
One, there are probably those who missed it the first time or weren't here when it first ran.
Two, maybe some of the newbies might want to contribute there stories.
Three, perhaps those who already posted wish to add some new information.

johnhannibalsmith
08-16-2013, 01:46 AM
.... My best work involved uncovering fuel tax evasion. No use boring anyone with the details but my audits and subsequent court testimony brought down more than a few almost notorious tax cheats in the NY/NJ metropollitan area.

...

:D

I must have missed this the first time through... still can't believe Franzese is walking around breathing air....

mostpost
08-16-2013, 02:44 AM
I ran across this thread while looking for something else. A lot of very interesting stories. I thought I would bump it up for three reasons.
One, there are probably those who missed it the first time or weren't here when it first ran.
Two, maybe some of the newbies might want to contribute there stories.
Three, perhaps those who already posted wish to add some new information.
Or they might want to contribute their stories. :blush:

ManU918
08-19-2013, 01:17 AM
Great thread... I'm glad mostpost bumped it. I have never seen it before.

burnsy
08-19-2013, 11:09 AM
I'm 50 years old and working part time (data collection), semi retired due to illness. I have Menieres disease which is making me deaf and altering my balance. I deal with chronic vertigo, which in the last couple years has receded....thank God. I'm divorced for 13 years my kids are 22 and 27, so i have plenty of time for my "other" job....handicapping. Lived in Saratoga other than my time in the Navy. Now that i'm sick (i was a union sheet metal worker) my other pursuits have been academic, i have an AAS. in Accounting, A BS in Economics and am working on a MA in Social Policy. I play electric guitar (try to) and love music. Attend Mt. Jam every year and various rock concerts.......Furthur, Govt. Mule,Phil and Friends, The Allman Bros. I even went to Alice Cooper opening day up here he was at the Palace in Albany.

I believe one of my strengths is keeping an open mind, one of the reasons i read this political thread is to see how "small" people think and how they restrict themselves to outdated, partisan beliefs. Being able to think for yourself and form your OWN opinion is huge in life and handicapping. When i read posts here i can sort of tell whose good at handicapping and who isn't just by the thought pattern. If you can't see the big picture or form your own opinion.......not in all cases, but in most.......you are not good at picking horses. I actually think that there are people that only post around here....because when it come to horse racing.....they don't have a clue. You can already tell they don't have an economical, historical or political clue on policy. If you are gullable here, towing the party line and zero street smarts, you probably can't pick a race horse either.....it all goes hand in hand. A closed mind, never will win at the race track.