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dilanesp
12-17-2017, 11:24 PM
I watched the Springboard Derby tonight and Remington displays the weight of each horse.

Why isn't this information routinely available to handicappers? Wouldn't you like to know if a horse took off 30 pounds from his last start?

JustRalph
12-17-2017, 11:41 PM
I watched the Springboard Derby tonight and Remington displays the weight of each horse.

Why isn't this information routinely available to handicappers? Wouldn't you like to know if a horse took off 30 pounds from his last start?

I used to think this would be a good idea. But then I realized the trainers would just lie

cj
12-18-2017, 12:04 AM
They've been doing that for years, but you have to track it yourself. They don't show like "last three race weights" or anything else, and it isn't available in the program.

VigorsTheGrey
12-18-2017, 01:43 AM
Where and how are the weights displayed...? Are they available online..?

dilanesp
12-18-2017, 08:28 PM
Where and how are the weights displayed...? Are they available online..?

I saw them on the track video feed.

cj
12-19-2017, 01:19 AM
I saw them on the track video feed.

Yes, that is it, and it isn't up for more than a minute.

JustRalph
12-19-2017, 02:07 PM
Yes, that is it, and it isn't up for more than a minute.

Accurate? I would never put any "weight” into this number

cj
12-21-2017, 01:10 PM
Accurate? I would never put any "weight” into this number

I have no idea if it is accurate. I remember when Freehold put weight in to the program for every running line. At least in harness racing, it had very little predictive value if any at all.

thaskalos
12-21-2017, 01:24 PM
I watched the Springboard Derby tonight and Remington displays the weight of each horse.

Why isn't this information routinely available to handicappers? Wouldn't you like to know if a horse took off 30 pounds from his last start?

Do they officially WEIGH these horses on actual SCALES before every start? Otherwise...how can any "weight-difference" in-between starts be ascertained?

TJC
12-21-2017, 01:55 PM
There is a picture of the scale at

https://www.aqha.com/racing/industry-news/2016/august/083016-remington-park-horse-weights/

VigorsTheGrey
12-21-2017, 02:00 PM
I would like to see the weights tracked and posted...Other tracks in other countries do this, notably, I believe, in Hong Kong, and the commentators there routinely reference weight changes/ amounts as part of paddock profiling...

I can think of at least one reason: The Alpha Horse, herd animals, you know, the biggest, tallest, strongest horse in the pack...maybe the others just tend to follow, even if he is not always, the fastest...:cool:

thaskalos
12-21-2017, 02:22 PM
There is a picture of the scale at

https://www.aqha.com/racing/industry-news/2016/august/083016-remington-park-horse-weights/

Thank you. :ThmbUp:

This is a great idea...that should be implemented at every racetrack in the country...IMO.

johnhenry81
12-21-2017, 03:22 PM
My wife told me that weights change, character is forever. :)

JustRalph
12-21-2017, 04:14 PM
No way in hell a trainer allows a big weight loss to be recorded.

Owners ask questions........I’m sure when their horses lose weight

chadk66
12-22-2017, 04:10 PM
actual weights could be an interesting angle in handicapping. many horses actually benefit by putting on some more "muscle" weight. Many are not up to snuff nutritionally and lower weight can often mean poorer finishes.

JustRalph
12-22-2017, 04:46 PM
Would somebody who knows, explain to me just how much weight loss is enough to make you worry? Or weight gain for that matter?

chadk66
12-22-2017, 09:22 PM
Would somebody who knows, explain to me just how much weight loss is enough to make you worry? Or weight gain for that matter?90% of the trainers wouldn't even know what the actual weight fluctuations are in their horses. Very few have scales. It's simply a guess. And to be honest, while using a scale, appearances are quite deceiving most times.

jay68802
12-23-2017, 02:11 PM
Gulfstream is putting up weights also.

Ruffian1
12-23-2017, 02:36 PM
90% of the trainers wouldn't even know what the actual weight fluctuations are in their horses. Very few have scales. It's simply a guess. And to be honest, while using a scale, appearances are quite deceiving most times.

Spot on Chad.

chadk66
12-24-2017, 09:12 PM
true weights would be a neat wrinkle. But I'm really not sure it would be of any actual benefit. Probably just one more thing to beat yourself up about. As horses mature they gain weight due to muscle mass. Muscle weighs far more than fat. So if trying to find a horse that's racing lighter than he did previously, it may not be in your best interest. On an older horse that is fully matured it could possibly benefit a handicapper. Just the weight number may be a trivial thing unless you can put an image of the horses condition along with it from various times. An example would be a horse that may have been fighting an illness or become dehydrated and dropped a significant amount of weight. If you saw that horse with your eye you may be able to pick up on the fact the horse may not look very good. Then two months later these issues may have been resolved and the horse is 100lbs heavier then you can say yep, he's much healthier and will run far better. That's a time when weight gain is beneficial to a horse. So it may be a really tough angle to capitalize on unless you can have physical appearances to go along with it. Just my thoughts.

dilanesp
12-25-2017, 12:53 AM
true weights would be a neat wrinkle. But I'm really not sure it would be of any actual benefit. Probably just one more thing to beat yourself up about. As horses mature they gain weight due to muscle mass. Muscle weighs far more than fat. So if trying to find a horse that's racing lighter than he did previously, it may not be in your best interest. On an older horse that is fully matured it could possibly benefit a handicapper. Just the weight number may be a trivial thing unless you can put an image of the horses condition along with it from various times. An example would be a horse that may have been fighting an illness or become dehydrated and dropped a significant amount of weight. If you saw that horse with your eye you may be able to pick up on the fact the horse may not look very good. Then two months later these issues may have been resolved and the horse is 100lbs heavier then you can say yep, he's much healthier and will run far better. That's a time when weight gain is beneficial to a horse. So it may be a really tough angle to capitalize on unless you can have physical appearances to go along with it. Just my thoughts.

Here's the thing. It's a piece of information. Like any other piece of information, it could be very relevant or not relevant at all. Not any different than "blinkers on".

But in general, whatever information is available should be made available to the wagering public so it can be factored in, or not factored in, by handicapppers.

chadk66
12-25-2017, 03:10 PM
Here's the thing. It's a piece of information. Like any other piece of information, it could be very relevant or not relevant at all. Not any different than "blinkers on".

But in general, whatever information is available should be made available to the wagering public so it can be factored in, or not factored in, by handicapppers.that's probably true. Not sure how it could be done in a reasonable manner. You'd have to weigh em all on the same scale or certified scales that get calibrated every so often. Do you weigh them the day before, morning of or four hours before post or what? The best way would be as they leave the receiving barn to go to paddock but that doesn't give you much time to use that info for handicapping. Doing it on the backside in the morning would be very hard to do.

JustRalph
12-25-2017, 03:42 PM
Why not a trip by the scale on the way to any workout?

Tom
12-25-2017, 05:00 PM
More rocket science for the industry! :rolleyes:

The way the tracks time races, why would I beleive a horse's weight?
This is a technology-challenged game. :pound:

luisbe
12-25-2017, 06:37 PM
Would somebody who knows, explain to me just how much weight loss is enough to make you worry? Or weight gain for that matter?
Imagine yourself as a 100 mts runner. Also imagine you won the last race with 160 pounds. You got injured and you didn't run for 4 months, next race you are 170 pounds, would you consider that before analyzing the race in search of probable winner? I would.
Of course we are talking about horses not being developed, since these are putting in muscle weight but the great majority of runners are 5yo or older.

chadk66
12-26-2017, 06:18 PM
Why not a trip by the scale on the way to any workout?Logistically this would be easier than race day.

Tom
12-27-2017, 10:16 AM
They can't even get gelding days correct.:rolleyes:

AstrosFan
12-30-2017, 10:47 PM
Weights don't do a thing for me, never will...even when I play Hong Kong

elhelmete
01-07-2018, 04:53 PM
Santa Anita showing weights today, on track.