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Redboard
10-27-2017, 01:34 PM
For a newbie to the game, which books would you recommend them reading before going to the track? You can select up to three. If you have a suggestion not on this list, please keep it to a book that’s still in print.

You may be wondering why I made a poll out of this and didn’t just ask the question. Well, when just asking the question, people will tend to not suggest a book if it’s already been mentioned and readers won’t get a feel for what’s the most recommended.

In case there’s a problem reading the options, here’s my complete list:

Picking Winners: A Horseplayer's Guide by Andrew Beyer 1994
Betting on Horse Racing For Dummies by Richard Eng
The Winning Horseplayer by Andrew Beyer 2007
Betting Thoroughbreds by Steven Davidovitz and Andrew Beyer 1997
Exotic Betting by Steven Crist 2006
Bet With the Best by Andrew Beyer and Steve Davidowitz 2001
Getting the Best of It by David Sklansky 1997
How to WIN the PICK 6 by Steven Kolb 2009
Betting Thoroughbreds for the 21st Century by Steve Davidowitz and Steven Crist 2009
Finding The Hidden Horse: Tips, tricks, angles and secrets by William Davidson 2017
The Blood-Horse Authoritative Guide to Betting Thorougbreds by the Blood-Horse staff 2005
Profitable Horse Race Betting Using Stock Market Techniques by Aaron Ainslie and Woodbine Mike 2015
Secrets of Professional Turf Betting by Robert L Bacon 1952
Commonsense Betting by Dick Mitchell 1995
Overlay, Overlay by Bill Heller 2004
Thoroughbred Cycles by Mark Cramer 1990
Handicapping 101 by Brad Free 2004
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Betting on Horses by Sharon B. Smith 1998
Beyer on Speed by Andrew Beyer 2012
Trifecta: The Business of Betting Thoroughbreds by Bobby Zen 2012
Finding an Edge: A 21st century book for 21st century by Ron Loftus 2014
Winning without Thinking by Nick Mordin 2002
Six Secrets of Successful Bettors by Frank R. Scatoni and Peter Thomas Fornatale 2005
Money Secrets At The Racetrack Paperback by Barry Meadow 2000
Smarter Bets - The Exacta Way by Keith Hoffman 2013
Betting Maidens and 2-Year-Olds by Dan Illman 2005
Winning Horseracing Handicapping by Chuck Badone 1999
The Power of Early Speed by Steve Klein 2005
Modern Pace Handicapping by Tom Brohamer 2000
None, just go to the track.
None, all are outdated.
Other (please specify)

sydr
10-27-2017, 02:39 PM
Horse Racing Logic by Glendon Jones

thaskalos
10-27-2017, 03:50 PM
PLAYING NO-LIMIT HOLD'EM AS A BUSINESS ...by Rob Tucker

jasperson
10-27-2017, 03:52 PM
This book was copyrighted in 1963 but it contains almost all of our present day handicapping tools. It had speed and pace figure,weight earnings,trainer,jockey % and all in a clear concise manner. It only has 190 pages and is a quick read.

ldiatone
10-27-2017, 06:24 PM
overlay overlay i missed it

green80
10-27-2017, 06:51 PM
Maxims and Methods of Pittsburg Phil, written over 100 years ago and 90% of it still holds true today. In my opinion, best book ever written on the game.

betovernetcapper
10-27-2017, 07:50 PM
Something I've observed from newbies is they will ask sometimes ask questions they are clearly derived from books that are a quarter of a century or more old. A typical question would be "When I add the variant # to the speed rating then...........". If a book is more then say 5 years old, it's probably best to hold it with a little cynicism. The game has changed a great deal since Tom Ainsley and it's changing everyday. Reading the classics is to be encouraged but in reading them remember the game has changed and will continue to. :)

Quesmark
10-27-2017, 10:52 PM
My "other" selection is:

The Handicapper's Condition Book, Revised: An Advanced Treatment of Thoroughbred Class
Dec 12, 2000
by James Quinn

fellowmen
10-27-2017, 10:58 PM
Winners File Henry Kuck

crestridge
10-28-2017, 02:01 AM
Pace Makes The Race by Tom Hambleton

The Four Quarters Of Horse Investing by Steve Fierro

Extreme Pace Handicapping by Randy Giles

Calibration Handicapping by Jim Lehane

Math texts on ratios/regressions to the mean/knowledge of Excel

CincyHorseplayer
10-28-2017, 02:07 AM
Superior Handicapping, Fat Stacks, and the Bliss of the Degenerate Side of Horseplaying-Cincyhorseplayer.

garyscpa
10-28-2017, 10:41 AM
My "other" selection is:

The Handicapper's Condition Book, Revised: An Advanced Treatment of Thoroughbred Class
Dec 12, 2000
by James Quinn

This was my other.

Whosonfirst
10-28-2017, 11:18 AM
For newbies, Winning At The Track, by David Christopher. I don't know if it's related to the software program or website of the same name, but it may be. Not sure why Mr. Christopher's name isn't attached to website, unless he's passed on. This little book is 30 years old, and while it doesn't always hone in on one winner, it does a good job at identifying exactas, tri's and supers. His use of speed ratings changed my mind on what's decent form vs. some of the more traditional definitions. From memory, he relies mostly on last race, or occasionally 2nd last race. I admit to thinking it was too simplistic on first look, but then I saw how it worked.

hracingplyr
10-28-2017, 12:10 PM
I have both Calibration Handicapping and Power Pace I will sell at a discount.

reckless
10-28-2017, 12:23 PM
I have both Calibration Handicapping and Power Pace I will sell at a discount.

I am very interested in both, especially Calibration Handicapping. Please PM the details. Thanks.

Viruss
10-28-2017, 12:27 PM
Here a few you left out..

Ainslie's Complete Guide to Thoroughbred Racing
Calibration Handicapping
Recreational Handicapping


Earl J

hracingplyr
10-28-2017, 01:19 PM
I don't see an email add for you. drop me a line at robertj1949@gmail.com and will send you the info.

Bob

hracingplyr
10-28-2017, 01:31 PM
Don't see an email add for you. drop me a line at robertj1949@gmail.com and will send you the info.

bob

Clocker
10-28-2017, 02:58 PM
My "other" selection is:

The Handicapper's Condition Book, Revised: An Advanced Treatment of Thoroughbred Class
Dec 12, 2000
by James Quinn

A very important topic for newbies. Certainly not the first book to read, but perhaps the third. For those not familiar with the book, "condition" refers to the conditions of the race, not the condition of the horse. The details and examples in the book are dated, but the principles are more important than ever as racing secretaries write increasingly detailed conditions.

Also, I find it curious that 6 people recommended the 1997 edition of Steve Davidowitz's book, and only 2 recommended the 2009 edition. It has been a long time since I read either, but as I remember, Davidowitz was somewhat dismissive of pace handicapping in the first edition, more open to it in the 2009 edition.

GMB@BP
10-28-2017, 07:50 PM
I feel like in the world of super trainers, rebates, contests, drugs, etc that a lot of those older books have fallen by the way side.

thaskalos
10-28-2017, 08:22 PM
While it's true that certain handicapping books contain nuggets of information which could prove helpful for the beginner...it's also true that these same books contain enough misinformation to do the novice player more harm than good. The bad thing about being a beginner is that he can't distinguish the useful nuggets from the unsubstantiated claims...and, consequently, he can be easily led astray.

There is no real need for handicapping books in today's wagering landscape. The beginner should instead open a modest account at the ADW of his choice...thus securing for himself the day's past-performances at near-zero cost. After that...he can proceed with his horse-betting education at his own pace, without any negative influence from the misinformed people around him. If he is smart, then he will make sure that his "tuition costs" are kept to a minimum...and if he ISN'T so smart, then his tuition will be as costly for him as mine was for me. In either case...his mistakes will be his own...and he will learn from them going forward.

I am an avid reader...and I've read every serious handicapping work that has been published during the last 37 years. As I now look back at my horseplaying life...it occurs to me that I could have put that reading time to much better use.

jasperson
10-30-2017, 10:45 AM
While it's true that certain handicapping books contain nuggets of information which could prove helpful for the beginner...it's also true that these same books contain enough misinformation to do the novice player more harm than good. The bad thing about being a beginner is that he can't distinguish the useful nuggets from the unsubstantiated claims...and, consequently, he can be easily led astray.

There is no real need for handicapping books in today's wagering landscape. The beginner should instead open a modest account at the ADW of his choice...thus securing for himself the day's past-performances at near-zero cost. After that...he can proceed with his horse-betting education at his own pace, without any negative influence from the misinformed people around him. If he is smart, then he will make sure that his "tuition costs" are kept to a minimum...and if he ISN'T so smart, then his tuition will be as costly for him as mine was for me. In either case...his mistakes will be his own...and he will learn from them going forward.

I am an avid reader...and I've read every serious handicapping work that has been published during the last 37 years. As I now look back at my horseplaying life...it occurs to me that I could have put that reading time to much better use.
I have to disagree. The book I recommended "SCIENTIFIC HANDICAPPING" Written in1963 covered most of the handicapping factors that I use today.
Speed
pace
class
form
weight
trainer
jockey
horse's appearance in the paddock and on the track
work outs
trouble
They had examples of how to compute speed figure and pace figures They had par times and parallel time charts way before Andy Beyers and Brohamer. The book was well written and easy to understand and I am sure it they were using their methods prior to 1963 they were winners. Granted we have better speed and pace figures now, but they were way ahead of the game then. I think if you had read this book you would recommend it to any beginning handicapper.

AndyC
10-30-2017, 01:39 PM
I have to disagree. The book I recommended "SCIENTIFIC HANDICAPPING" Written in1963 covered most of the handicapping factors that I use today.
Speed
pace
class
form
weight
trainer
jockey
horse's appearance in the paddock and on the track
work outs
trouble
They had examples of how to compute speed figure and pace figures They had par times and parallel time charts way before Andy Beyers and Brohamer. The book was well written and easy to understand and I am sure it they were using their methods prior to 1963 they were winners. Granted we have better speed and pace figures now, but they were way ahead of the game then. I think if you had read this book you would recommend it to any beginning handicapper.

I have to agree with Thaskalos. Most handicapping books can yield a few bits of good information and a lot of misinformation. I think it is essential that a new gambler have a strong understanding of statistics and probability before diving into the data to make betting decisions.

thaskalos
10-30-2017, 03:52 PM
I have to disagree. The book I recommended "SCIENTIFIC HANDICAPPING" Written in1963 covered most of the handicapping factors that I use today.
Speed
pace
class
form
weight
trainer
jockey
horse's appearance in the paddock and on the track
work outs
trouble
They had examples of how to compute speed figure and pace figures They had par times and parallel time charts way before Andy Beyers and Brohamer. The book was well written and easy to understand and I am sure it they were using their methods prior to 1963 they were winners. Granted we have better speed and pace figures now, but they were way ahead of the game then. I think if you had read this book you would recommend it to any beginning handicapper.

"Which book..." questions get asked often here, and the same book-recommendations are given each time. And yet, these questions continue to be asked going forward...as if some "new recommendation" could perhaps provide the horse-betting puzzle's "missing pieces". If only things were that simple...:)

The only real "shortcut" that I've ever found in the world of gambling is the acquisition of a true mentor...someone who actually embodies the qualities that the floundering player is trying to develop within himself. Such a person may not even have to offer any "earth-shattering" advice at all. Just the conclusive proof of his EXISTENCE often gives all the motivation one needs in order to embark on his own journey through the horse-betting minefield. Because, while the "knowledge" is out there, the "motivation" seems to be lacking...and not just in the world of gambling. Look at how much "expert advice" exists today on the topics of "nutrition and fitness". And yet...that pesky obesity problem continues to grow among us. :)

bisket
10-31-2017, 12:42 PM
The biggest revolution in modern handicapping is over course Beyer Speed Figures. I don't think a newbie can just go straight to Beyer's books. I think the best foundation for a new player is still Ainslie's Complete guide. If you start there you can get a better grasp of Beyer. From this point you can move onto pace data and other modern data. This is my history of development and I don't think a Handicapper can put data in proper perspective unless he understands the evolution of the data. Along with the understanding of data a player needs to develop a working knowledge of training methods. The person who had the most influence on my development always told me to learn how train and own a runner. This knowledge leads to knowing whether a horse is capable of winning today along with distinguishing whether he's fast enough to win. I don't play often enough to win trying to outsmart other speed handicappers. My method of winning these days is to use my knowledge of data to know when to bet against it.

Redboard
11-02-2017, 09:13 PM
"Which book..." questions get asked often here, and the same book-recommendations are given each time. And yet, these questions continue to be asked going forward...as if some "new recommendation" could perhaps provide the horse-betting puzzle's "missing pieces". If only things were that simple...:)

The only real "shortcut" that I've ever found in the world of gambling is the acquisition of a true mentor...someone who actually embodies the qualities that the floundering player is trying to develop within himself. Such a person may not even have to offer any "earth-shattering" advice at all. Just the conclusive proof of his EXISTENCE often gives all the motivation one needs in order to embark on his own journey through the horse-betting minefield. Because, while the "knowledge" is out there, the "motivation" seems to be lacking...and not just in the world of gambling. Look at how much "expert advice" exists today on the topics of "nutrition and fitness". And yet...that pesky obesity problem continues to grow among us. :)

Of course a mentor that has played for decades would be a good thing to have. But where does one find these mentors? My question had to do with someone who is brand new and doesn't know what a speed figure or class drop, is.

thaskalos
11-03-2017, 01:10 AM
Of course a mentor that has played for decades would be a good thing to have. But where does one find these mentors? My question had to do with someone who is brand new and doesn't know what a speed figure or class drop, is.

In that case...I suggest youtube. Succinct, and to the point. :ThmbUp:

Aerocraft67
11-03-2017, 05:18 PM
I threw in the vote for Eng's "For Dummies" entry. Not terribly sexy but doesn't adhere to any gimmick and lays it all out for people new to the game. I've also read the Davidowitz and Crist books; they were more useful after I played for a while. Even now the Davidowitz book kind of rambles like an old man telling tales rather than a primer for the track; the good info is buried and seems outmoded by stats that point out the same things like key races. But it's probably the most comprehensive tome out there. Going exotic right out of the gate captivated me and led me astray as a beginner, although Crist's book is a very good treatise on that topic. Eng covers all the basics and still serves as a good reference for stuff I skipped like conditions. I'd like to check out Free's 101 book, that could be a good suggestion, I just haven't read it.

davew
11-03-2017, 08:01 PM
for the people who do not like reading books, I suggest a DVD set of one of the daily racing form handicapping expos to get a handle on types of factors some people take into consideration when betting.

KPMats10
11-05-2017, 04:26 PM
The first two I would read are Handicapping 101 and then The Handicapper's Condition Book (didn't see that one listed).

SandyW
11-06-2017, 12:11 AM
Handicapping Magic


by Michael Pizzolla (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&text=Michael+Pizzolla&search-alias=books&field-author=Michael+Pizzolla&sort=relevancerank) (Author)

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51XC1QWVF2L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Denny
11-06-2017, 05:01 PM
How can you not include Ainslie's Complete Guide to Thoroughbred Racing?????

Or ANY of his other books.

Why list Andy Beyer at the top of the list?

He's going to get extra votes just for that.

CincyHorseplayer
11-06-2017, 05:22 PM
I picked Beyer as much for his insight into the game and because I like his stories and actually has some literary skill! I like Quinn because he has an intense grasp on the game and writes like they are textbooks. I wish Beyer would write a big fat 1,000 pager on just racetrack experiences. I know he's got it in him! Andy whatta ya say brother?!

CincyHorseplayer
11-06-2017, 05:23 PM
Handicapping Magic


by Michael Pizzolla (https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&text=Michael+Pizzolla&search-alias=books&field-author=Michael+Pizzolla&sort=relevancerank) (Author)

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51XC1QWVF2L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Sandy this is a great book. His turf thoughts which are few I don't agree with but applying the fulcrum concept to turf races more than any exposes pretenders. It was my saving grace at Saratoga!

Racetrack Playa
11-06-2017, 06:55 PM
For newbies and oldies :ThmbUp:
How To Win At The Race$ by Sam(the Genius)Lewin -1969-
and The War of Art by Steven Pressfield -2002-

thaskalos
11-06-2017, 10:38 PM
One book that I WOULD'T recommend to a newcomer is Beyer's PICKING WINNERS. The notion that the Beyer figures are "the Way, the Truth and the Light", while class and pace have "nothing to do" with the race-results that we see...could cause irreversible damage to the novice player's bankroll.

Michael
11-06-2017, 11:28 PM
Ainslie's Complete Guide to Thoroughbred Racing gets the nod from me. :ThmbUp:

AndyC
11-07-2017, 08:38 PM
One book that I WOULD'T recommend to a newcomer is Beyer's PICKING WINNERS. The notion that the Beyer figures are "the Way, the Truth and the Light", while class and pace have "nothing to do" with the race-results that we see...could cause irreversible damage to the novice player's bankroll.

I have known some very successful figure players who ignore the pace and class.

thaskalos
11-07-2017, 10:06 PM
I have known some very successful figure players who ignore the pace and class.

They must have trainers like the late Bobby Frankel whispering in their ears.

zerosky
11-08-2017, 08:09 AM
Ainslie's Complete Guide to Thoroughbred Racing gets the nod from me. :ThmbUp:

me too

JustRalph
11-09-2017, 12:59 PM
I feel like in the world of super trainers, rebates, contests, drugs, etc that a lot of those older books have fallen by the way side.

Very diplomatic. You’re exactly right 👍

CincyHorseplayer
11-12-2017, 06:57 PM
All those books are great for basic handicapping. Didn't we all run out of books for the most part before we realized that there was slim pickins on being a great bettor? Many of the handicappers confessed that they didn't play much. Targeting a meet or two per year. Learning the landscape of available tracks and times and where you are good or bad and having something to sink your teeth into regularly during different seasons of the year is huge too. When I first got on here I was glad to get Scooby Snacks from my peers for being a decent handicapper but it didn't take long to realize I was not a great bettor! And after a lengthy stop play in 2015 I am only starting to realize that I am becoming a smarter player. After 21 years! The mentoring here helps. I can be social and antisocial at times on track. Not exactly the consistency required to develop sustained learning relationships.

biggestal99
11-17-2017, 02:41 PM
I went with the two BEYERS and one Davidowitz.

cycles by Cramer, and Brohamer Modern pace handicapping

after those 3 are fully digested,

Allan

thaskalos
11-18-2017, 01:02 PM
I posted this link in another forum of this site...but I think that it fits here too. A great place for the beginning player to visit, IMO...and also good for a revisit by the "grizzled veterans" among us. Plenty of handicapping and betting information...without any effort or cost attached in order to avail ourselves of it.

http://www.handicapping.com/library/

BettinBilly
11-23-2017, 03:59 PM
This isn't going to be a popular post, but honestly, it's a great book for a newbie.

"Betting on Horse Racing for Dummies" by Richard Eng.

Yeah, I know. Those "Dummie" books are for real dummies, right? I used to think that, but honestly, this is a truly well written book. Eng is a good author and his 20 years as Turf Editor and Handicapper for the Las Vegas Review-Journal gives him a good foundation to write this book. His style of writing is concise, fact-filled and yet fun to read.

I read this book about 5 years ago on a whim.... I think it was on super special on Amazon Kindle, so I went for it. I have read all the popular books over the years, and really tried to read this book as if I knew NOTHING about handicapping or horse racing in general. I have to say, it would be (IMO of course) a GREAT book for a newbie.

-Billy

ultracapper
11-26-2017, 10:22 PM
A very large majority of members here will be able to give you better advise on this particular subject than I, but I strongly, strongly, strongly suggest that all efforts when originally getting started should be focussed first on finding what makes handicapping and horse racing in general, FUN!!

Whithout fun, this experience will be gut wrenching. IT'S GOT TO BE FUN!!!!

thaskalos
11-27-2017, 01:54 AM
IMO...the newcomer to this game has to develop as strong a liking for the handicapping aspect as for the actual watching and betting of the races. I have spent a large portion of my life at horse-betting facilities...and the carelessness that I see there by virtually every person present never ceases to amaze me. To a man, they all buy the form or the program on their way into the facility, and they all do their handicapping in-between the races...while furiously flipping the pages from the 1st race at Hawthorne to the 3rd at Aqueduct...and then to the 4th at Parx. After giving a brief glance at the race in question, they quickly dash to the betting terminal...where they decide in the most haphazard manner possible how to structure their wagers and bet their money. And some of these careless people bet amounts of money that are hard for any reasonable person to comprehend. I strongly suspect that the vast majority of the "at-home" bettors are just as negligent in the performance of their horseplaying duties as their "live-racing" counterparts. And they do it this way for many years, at great financial cost...because this is what's most "fun" to them.

If the newcomer isn't of the studious type, who develops an understanding early on about the difficulty and the demands that are associated with the proper play of this game...then it would benefit him immensely if he never got involved in this game at all. Foolhardy habits are very difficult to break...and far too costly to keep.

lamboguy
11-28-2017, 09:19 AM
IMO...the newcomer to this game has to develop as strong a liking for the handicapping aspect as for the actual watching and betting of the races. I have spent a large portion of my life at horse-betting facilities...and the carelessness that I see there by virtually every person present never ceases to amaze me. To a man, they all buy the form or the program on their way into the facility, and they all do their handicapping in-between the races...while furiously flipping the pages from the 1st race at Hawthorne to the 3rd at Aqueduct...and then to the 4th at Parx. After giving a brief glance at the race in question, they quickly dash to the betting terminal...where they decide in the most haphazard manner possible how to structure their wagers and bet their money. And some of these careless people bet amounts of money that are hard for any reasonable person to comprehend. I strongly suspect that the vast majority of the "at-home" bettors are just as negligent in the performance of their horseplaying duties as their "live-racing" counterparts. And they do it this way for many years, at great financial cost...because this is what's most "fun" to them.

If the newcomer isn't of the studious type, who develops an understanding early on about the difficulty and the demands that are associated with the proper play of this game...then it would benefit him immensely if he never got involved in this game at all. Foolhardy habits are very difficult to break...and far too costly to keep.you have to be prepared hours before the race and be able to adjust if the track does not favor you.

Mountaineer was a great place for me this year because i have been playing it consistently this century. the part i like is that you can spot the bias right after the first race has been run. for most people it takes them 2 or 3 races. i have been fortunate to get it right almost all the time and have made money on that 2nd and 3rd race before the rest of the crowd was able to figure it out! its about the only thing that has worked well for me in racing lately. its only about 4 months to go for the new season to come rolling in.

delayjf
12-20-2017, 07:56 PM
I think the best foundation for a new player is still Ainslie's Complete guide. If you start there you can get a better grasp of Beyer.

I'm not sure Ainslie is still relevant today - If I had to pick one book for a newbee, I would pick the newest version of Davidowtiz book. It covers everything from speed / pace to bias and trainers profiles and relates better to the modern game. I would also add Fotias work on pace to the list (Blinkers Off)

TucsonGreyhound
12-27-2017, 03:26 AM
I picked Beyer as much for his insight into the game and because I like his stories and actually has some literary skill! I like Quinn because he has an intense grasp on the game and writes like they are textbooks. I wish Beyer would write a big fat 1,000 pager on just racetrack experiences. I know he's got it in him! Andy whatta ya say brother?!

Yes! Are there any classic books out there someone can recommend that focus more on the gambling shenanigans, degenerate lifestyles back in the golden ages of horse racing? I love that stuff!

Racey
12-28-2017, 12:12 AM
mark cramer such as kinky handicapping

Baron Star Gregg
01-08-2018, 03:09 PM
My "other" selection is:

The Handicapper's Condition Book, Revised: An Advanced Treatment of Thoroughbred Class
Dec 12, 2000
by James Quinn

The Handicapper's Condition Book is FANTASTIC!

for the people who do not like reading books, I suggest a DVD set of one of the daily racing form handicapping expos to get a handle on types of factors some people take into consideration when betting.

Sorry but this would be a waste of money to most people.

IMO...the newcomer to this game has to develop as strong a liking for the handicapping aspect as for the actual watching and betting of the races. I have spent a large portion of my life at horse-betting facilities...and the carelessness that I see there by virtually every person present never ceases to amaze me. To a man, they all buy the form or the program on their way into the facility, and they all do their handicapping in-between the races...while furiously flipping the pages from the 1st race at Hawthorne to the 3rd at Aqueduct...and then to the 4th at Parx. After giving a brief glance at the race in question, they quickly dash to the betting terminal...where they decide in the most haphazard manner possible how to structure their wagers and bet their money. And some of these careless people bet amounts of money that are hard for any reasonable person to comprehend. I strongly suspect that the vast majority of the "at-home" bettors are just as negligent in the performance of their horseplaying duties as their "live-racing" counterparts. And they do it this way for many years, at great financial cost...because this is what's most "fun" to them.

If the newcomer isn't of the studious type, who develops an understanding early on about the difficulty and the demands that are associated with the proper play of this game...then it would benefit him immensely if he never got involved in this game at all. Foolhardy habits are very difficult to break...and far too costly to keep.

I've actually talked to a young man in line at the window that didn't know the race he was going to bet was on the turf and that the turf course was GRASS.

Yes! Are there any classic books out there someone can recommend that focus more on the gambling shenanigans, degenerate lifestyles back in the golden ages of horse racing? I love that stuff!

The book The Backstretch (My First Decade Playing the Game) has some of what you're looking for as long as you can look past the writing skills of the author and his editor (if there was an editor).

mikesal57
01-08-2018, 08:21 PM
mark cramer such as kinky handicapping

What exactly is in this book?

I have had this book for 25 years and never even got into bending the cover...


It would be considered ultra pristine condition...LOL

Mike

Clocker
01-09-2018, 08:29 PM
Yes! Are there any classic books out there someone can recommend that focus more on the gambling shenanigans, degenerate lifestyles back in the golden ages of horse racing? I love that stuff!

These are very good. Also check out the Amazon pages these links take you to for more ideas.

https://www.amazon.com/Horseplayers-Life-Track-Ted-McClelland/dp/155652675X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1515543634&sr=8-2&keywords=horseplayers

https://www.amazon.com/Not-Long-Shot-Season-Horse/dp/1586485660/ref=pd_sim_14_4?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=1586485660&pd_rd_r=8Y9VH9ZY4ABTH3WTDBYX&pd_rd_w=19hu8&pd_rd_wg=gKMRf&psc=1&refRID=8Y9VH9ZY4ABTH3WTDBYX#reader_1586485660

https://www.amazon.com/May-Horse-Be-You-Track/dp/1932910859/ref=pd_sbs_14_3?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=1932910859&pd_rd_r=CV45SB560Z386413YQXA&pd_rd_w=fUwJg&pd_rd_wg=mAbJl&psc=1&refRID=CV45SB560Z386413YQXA

https://www.amazon.com/Wrong-Horse-Odyssey-Through-American/dp/0671767747/ref=pd_sim_14_5?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=0671767747&pd_rd_r=H53W1QJW604X0CN7J0JE&pd_rd_w=y4KHO&pd_rd_wg=86qu6&psc=1&refRID=H53W1QJW604X0CN7J0JE

bpiets
01-16-2018, 11:28 AM
go over to UPINCLASS and see what a few of the handicappers there select on special days of racing like the k.d. etc etc...they select very well indeed...:)