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PIC6SIX
03-28-2017, 03:27 PM
Are Bris final time PARs universal across race conditions?? Meaning an 85 final time BRIS for 6F run by a 10K Open Claimer 4 and up is that equal to an 85 run by a NW1-ALW at 6F 4 and up???. Obviously, the fractional times may be somewhat different but the actual final times should by similar, correct?? Daily track variant may enter the picture, I know, but on similar variant days should not these final times be similar????

whodoyoulike
03-28-2017, 10:13 PM
I hate to suggest this to you but doesn't the BRIS website explain this.

http://www.brisnet.com/cgi-bin/static.cgi?page=library

Class Ratings
The Bloodstock Research (BRIS) Class Rating is an objective measure of a
Thoroughbred's performance. It is based on the premise that a horse’s current racing
ability can be gauged by considering the horses he has beaten recently, those that have
beaten him and the margins involved. THE HIGHER THE CLASS RATING, THE BETTER THE
HORSE HAS RUN IN RECENT STARTS.
Class Ratings provide a convenient way to compare the relative merits of a horse’s
recent races. One way to use Class Ratings to handicap races is to prefer horses with
high Class Ratings relative to their competitors. Among horses which are closely
matched in Class Ratings, prefer those which have run recently and are well suited to
today’s distance and surface.
Pace Ratings
The BRIS Pace Ratings measure how fast a horse ran in the early calls of the race, fully
adjusted for daily and track-to-track surface speed differences. The Pace Ratings are
comparable across all North American tracks, distances, and surfaces. A Rating of 85 at
Turfway Park is equivalent to an 85 at Beulah Park. THE HIGHER THE PACE RATING, THE
FASTER THE HORSE RAN IN THE EARLY CALLS OF THE RACE. The Pace Ratings use a standard
scale of 2 points per length, so a horse rated 6 points higher than another horse is
considered to have led by 3 lengths.
Pace Ratings are an invaluable tool for determining the likely pacesetters in a race and for
isolating the race’s true contenders. In using Pace Ratings to handicap, you can determine
the likely pacesetters, separate the “speed” horses, and predict the expected pace scenario.
Give the edge to a horse with a Pace advantage, especially if the track bias has been
favoring early speed types. Use Pace Ratings to help identify whether a horse’s form
cycle is on the upswing. Look for horses with improving Pace Ratings who also have
Speed Ratings as high as (or higher than) today’s competition.
Speed Ratings
BRIS Speed Ratings are provided for each start a horse has made and measure how fast
a horse ran from start to finish. They are comparable across all tracks, types of races,
distances, and surfaces, and THE HIGHER THE SPEED FIGURE, THE FASTER THE HORSE
RAN. Speed Figures reflect the speed of a track on any given day and enable fans to
easily compare the performances of horses which have run at different tracks, over fast
or slow strips, and over different distances. In Sprint races, each 1 1/2 points represents
1 length. In Route races, because beaten lengths usually increase as the length of the
race increases, each 1 point reflects 1 length. One guideline to remember is that Speed
Figures earned in sprint races will be more predictive than those earned in route races
due to the fact that the Figures earned in route races can be heavily influenced by racing
strategy. An 85 Speed Figure earned at Turfway Park is equivalent to an 85 Speed
Figure earned at Beulah Park.
Speed Ratings pinpoint which horses have run the fastest and are vital for eliminating
horses who are simply too slow. When using speed “figures”, focus on recent races run
on the same surface and at a similar distance as today’s race. Look for positive or negative
Speed Rating patterns to help predict today’s performance.

PIC6SIX
03-29-2017, 09:24 PM
Thanks for your reply. I was just trying to verify what I already thought was the correct answer. The data you provided just reinforced my assumption. I thought it would be MUCH easier to ask my question on PA vice going to BRIS.