PDA

View Full Version : Fining and suspending drivers for bad decisions


Stillriledup
02-23-2015, 09:04 PM
I was watching the 8th at Northfield tonight and the guy from the rail (the Saddle cloth 2 horse) was almost causing an accident trying to yield to the "hot favorite". He could have easily parked this guy the mile, which would have been the right thing to do given the guy on the horse trying to clear was jumping up and down and the horse was going nowhere.

Was it smart for the 2 horse to yield to a horse who wasn't pacing the turns all that quickly?

If a guy wants to clear, he should be able to clear without the guy strangling the air out of the horse who is trying to yield...if you can't just clear, than you have to be expected that you might get parked the mile, especially on a small track like Northfield.

Should judges step in and make a fine or suspension to the driver who yielded because he dangerously choked his horse back when he should have just let the horse pace as fast as he was ready to pace (and if you park the guy the mile, that's his problem)?

Any thoughts on judges stepping in and policing the races better, or should we just let drivers do whatever they want (and that includes giving up tucks and pulling into the cover flow first over without advancing i.e. blocking)?

RaceTrackDaddy
02-23-2015, 09:40 PM
I was watching the 8th at Northfield tonight and the guy from the rail (the Saddle cloth 2 horse) was almost causing an accident trying to yield to the "hot favorite". He could have easily parked this guy the mile, which would have been the right thing to do given the guy on the horse trying to clear was jumping up and down and the horse was going nowhere.

Was it smart for the 2 horse to yield to a horse who wasn't pacing the turns all that quickly?

If a guy wants to clear, he should be able to clear without the guy strangling the air out of the horse who is trying to yield...if you can't just clear, than you have to be expected that you might get parked the mile, especially on a small track like Northfield.

Should judges step in and make a fine or suspension to the driver who yielded because he dangerously choked his horse back when he should have just let the horse pace as fast as he was ready to pace (and if you park the guy the mile, that's his problem)?

Any thoughts on judges stepping in and policing the races better, or should we just let drivers do whatever they want (and that includes giving up tucks and pulling into the cover flow first over without advancing i.e. blocking)?

There are rules on the book against such actions. In fact, there might be another rule that applies to the one to cause confusion among trailing horses. One rule is about giving a hole to a horse when in fact it was in the horse's ability to keep the hole shut. I am sure there are more rules on the book that can be applied here; BUT it is up to the judges to enforce these rules.

In my personal history of this sport, very few judges tend to obey a strict allegiance to the rule book. Many of them have been former drivers and trainers and are reluctant to rule with a heavy hand. Rule of thumb seems to be if the action doesn't draw blood, no foul.

I just wish this sport would adopt a rule that thoroughbred racing has in place. That is, when a horse is interfered with or some action necessitated an inquiry, the offended parties (jockey, trainer and owner of the victimized horse (s) ) refuse to file an objection, they get a fine. Maybe when drivers in harness racing are forced to police themselves, it might become a more competitive sport.

Stillriledup
02-24-2015, 04:49 AM
There are rules on the book against such actions. In fact, there might be another rule that applies to the one to cause confusion among trailing horses. One rule is about giving a hole to a horse when in fact it was in the horse's ability to keep the hole shut. I am sure there are more rules on the book that can be applied here; BUT it is up to the judges to enforce these rules.

In my personal history of this sport, very few judges tend to obey a strict allegiance to the rule book. Many of them have been former drivers and trainers and are reluctant to rule with a heavy hand. Rule of thumb seems to be if the action doesn't draw blood, no foul.

I just wish this sport would adopt a rule that thoroughbred racing has in place. That is, when a horse is interfered with or some action necessitated an inquiry, the offended parties (jockey, trainer and owner of the victimized horse (s) ) refuse to file an objection, they get a fine. Maybe when drivers in harness racing are forced to police themselves, it might become a more competitive sport.

I know they don't want to be heavy handed when they feel the drivers can police themselves, but it just doesn't look good when guys are giving up tucks, bettors know all these drivers "golf together" and are friendly, especially the top 4 or 5 drivers at any track, they all have "power" and stay out of each others way, don't park each other unless they can't help it and give tucks and retakes when available....but it looks bad, it certainly doesn't inspire any confidence when you see this.

A couple races later at Northfield, in the 10th, Wrenn drove the 1 horse and should have strung out the field a bit and stuffed the 3 horse, by yielding to the 3, he cost himself any shot, he wins that race for fun if he's in the pocket or on the lead and he drove like he was 20-1. If that was a 500k race, no way that guy gets away 3rd...but in an overnight race, he's just being a "nice guy" and yielding to leavers...i guess if you know that is the "driving style" at northfield, its easier to handicap.....it doesn't make it any better though.

cmp92
02-24-2015, 03:58 PM
Valid points, SRU. But Northfield is not a track known for its integrity.

Lose The Juice
02-24-2015, 04:17 PM
Dumb drives have been a part of the sport since time immemorial, and are not the cause of its long and sad decline.

Stillriledup
02-24-2015, 04:38 PM
Dumb drives have been a part of the sport since time immemorial, and are not the cause of its long and sad decline.

I think my general question is this. Is there a point when the "dumbness" deserves a fine or suspension. Sometimes drivers get fined for "sitting the rail" on a 1-5 shot and getting boxed in and sometimes drivers will get DQd or someting for slowing the pace too much, but theres really no fine/suspension for a driver giving up a tuck when there was no reason to do so. Now, if you're on a 3-5 and plan on brushing, you can give up a tuck and then brush that's ok, but if you're just giving a tuck to give a tuck, that shouldn't be allowed as well as this stuff (esp at meadowlands) where drivers will pull first over and just sit on the rim waiting for cover or trying to not make their move too soon....if you pull, you gotta go and advance, none of this sitting in the road stuff.

Lose The Juice
02-24-2015, 04:53 PM
The patient is dying of other afflictions.