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highnote
06-05-2014, 08:42 PM
An interesting area of investigation for HANA would be the use of low oxygen stalls to help race horses. This is similar to high altitude training, but without being at a high altitude.

One well known public racing journalist suggests that perhaps the use of low oxygen stalls should be included in the past performances like Lasix and Bute.

Jeff P
06-06-2014, 05:57 AM
I agree with you.

But the problem isn't Low Oxygen Stalls.

The problem is far more widespread than that. I could probably make the argument that it's become widely accepted best practice in North American thoroughbred racing to hide nearly everything that relates to the condition of the horse from the bettor.

I could also make the argument that full transparency of veterinary procedures performed on a horse would go a long way towards improving public perception of North American horse racing when it comes to integrity. I could also make the argument that the current culture of non transparency (lack of integrity) is a contributing factor when it comes to racing's downward handle trend.

That said, we don't have to reinvent the wheel. The Hong Kong Jockey Club has a pretty good info model when it comes to transparency.

I wrote the following for the HANA site:
http://www.horseplayersassociation.org/hkjcmodel.html

The Hong Kong Jockey Club - An info model based on Transparency

The Hong Kong Jockey Club website contains a wealth of information. Navigate to the site at http://www.hkjc.com/home/english/ and click Horse Racing.

On race days, select Racing Info (Local) and then click on Entries.

From there, click on an entry to see past performance running line info for that entry.

Link to screenshot: Here. (http://www.horseplayersassociation.org/hkjc01.jpg)

I was impressed to discover that their running line info includes:

* Declared Weight of Horse

* Free Race Replays (including the gallop out)

I was also impressed to discover that each entry also includes a link labeled Veterinary Records.

Click the Veterinary Records to see a list of problems the horse has been treated for.

Link to screenshot: Here. (http://www.horseplayersassociation.org/hkjc02.jpg) And: Here. (http://www.horseplayersassociation.org/hkjc02.jpg)

Instead of hiding information from the bettor, as is common practice in North American thoroughbred racing, the Hong Kong Jockey Club is making information that relates to the condition of the horse available to bettors.

Transparency. What a novel idea.

Jeff Platt
President, HANA





-jp

.

DJofSD
06-06-2014, 10:12 AM
Jeff,

Would it be safe to assume these stalls are expensive to build and use? And furthermore, they're built and used by breeding farms?

Is there a list of where these things are located?

Jeff P
06-06-2014, 07:35 PM
DJ, I tried a Google search for the phrase "Low Oxygen Horse Stall." And while the search didn't turn up any info on low oxygen stalls for horses - it did turn up the following article:
http://horsesight.com/diseases%20_thrush.htm

Thrush - A common bacterial infection that occurs on the hoof of a horse, specifically in the region of the frog. The bacteria occur naturally in the animal's environment, especially in wet, muddy, or unsanitary conditions, such as an unclean stall—and grow best with low oxygen. Horses with deep clefts, or narrow or contracted heels are more at-risk to develop thrush.

Earlier this year I spent several weeks visiting family in the Phoenix area. The guest house I was staying in wasn't that far from The Phoenix Mountain Preserve. As a result my daily routine often included a morning run from the guest house to the trailhead where Piestewa Peak (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piestewa_Peak) is located - and from there a hike to the summit and back down - followed by a slower run back to the guest house.

While hiking the peak, I noticed many hikers wearing these. (http://www.trainingmask.com/)

I can't speak for the effectiveness of such devices but they don't appear to be all that expensive.

It wouldn't surprise me if someone, somewhere, is already using such a device on a horse.



-jp

.

BettinBilly
06-06-2014, 11:43 PM
Jeff,

Would it be safe to assume these stalls are expensive to build and use? And furthermore, they're built and used by breeding farms?

Is there a list of where these things are located?

I'm assuming these are basically Hyperbaric Chambers used in reverse to lower pressure and thus lower Oxygen density? Or are they somehow simply removing Oxygen density in stalls without pressure drop?

Either way, it is not ethical and not a natural outcome of training. And, it's dangerous. Who is monitoring the chamber pressure or oxy level all night? If something goes wrong, you have a dead horse in the morning. Seems very ill advised to me, and not in the true spirit of our sport.

Jeff P
06-07-2014, 05:12 PM
I have to admit I'm a bit out of my element here. I don't really know the engineering/mechanics of how a low oxygen environment is being created as well as what risks if any horses confined within such an envoronment are subject to.

I'm going to have to ask around for info - and see where it leads.


-jp

.

highnote
06-07-2014, 10:43 PM
Try searching "hypoxic training".

DJofSD
06-07-2014, 11:09 PM
Try searching "hypoxic training".
I added "horses" and here is the very first item on the list:

http://www.go2altitude.com/horse.html